What is Misokinesia?

by | Feb 5, 2015 | Articles | 410 comments

What is misokinesia

As if misophonia wasn’t enough, many of us suffer from a related condition called misokinesia.

If misophonia is best defined as a ‘hatred’ of certain sounds, misokinesia is probably best defined as a ‘hatred’ of certain movements.

These movements tend to be small and repetitive and often involve someone’s hands or face, or both.

Sufferers feel a combination of frenzied panic and confusion if they can see someone repeatedly touching their face out of the corner of their eye… fidgeting with something… or making other, irregular movements.

Does that sound like you?

If it does, the chances are you have misokinesia. If you already suffer from misophonia and can identify with this, then you almost certainly do.

I first discovered I had this aversion to movement when I was at University.

I’d gone to the cinema with my best friend and we were sat next to each other in the theatre. About 20 minutes into the film, he took a ring off his finger and started twirling it around his hand. He then raised it to his mouth and spent the rest of the film popping it in and out of his mouth.

He did this silently and didn’t make any dramatic or disruptive movements, but to me it felt like my whole world was on red alert. All I could focus on was that irritating movement out of the corner of my eye.

It was so bad that I can’t remember a single thing that happened in the film – I don’t even remember what the film was called. What I do remember, in painstaking detail, is every single minute little movement he made with his hands.

At the time I didn’t know whether to say something or ask him to stop. It was confusing. I felt furious and upset, but I was also aware everyone else in the theatre seemed to be fine with it. No one else had noticed, no-one else seemed bothered.

Because of this the rational part of my mind was saying: “come on now, he’s just fiddling with a bit of jewellery, he’s not interrupting the film in any way. He’s not being noisy or doing anything particularly weird.”

I chatted to his girlfriend about it afterwards and asked her whether she found it annoying when he fidgets or chews his fingernails. She hadn’t really noticed it. Moreover when I explained that I thought I might have an odd mental quirk regarding movements like this, she said that “yes, that does sound a bit strange”.

Even though I didn’t know it had a name at the time, I have memories of suffering from episodes of misophonia when I was 8 or 9 years old. The movement part, the misokinesia, I assumed was somehow related to the sound part – the act of seeing someone eat.

So when I got irritated by people clicking their fingers or making sudden movements I just put it down to me being irritable about certain things. It wasn’t until cinema-gate that I realised that something wasn’t right.

Since then I’ve talked to a number of people, many via this website, who experience these misokinesia (visual) triggers alongside their misophonia (sound) ones.

Some people have reported feeling a sense of slight nausea with their misokinesia as opposed to the blind panic normally associated with misophonia. For others it’s the other way around.

Many people have the same response to both (I fall into this category)… and then there are people who experience one but not the other.

My own, informal, surveying suggests that of the people I’ve communicated with, between a third and half of people with misophonia also have misokinesia. However comprehensive surveys under controlled conditions need to be run to determine the true figure.

Here’s a quick run down of some visual triggers that are sometimes associated with misokinesia:

  • Any kind of repetitive face touching (including pulling or playing with facial hair)
  • Fidgeting or any unusual hand movements
  • Chewing gum or food (specifically the visuals of the mouth contorting, as well as the sound)

There’s a fascinating bit of research a friend of mine is doing into something called ASMR (autonomous sensory meridian response). She looking for possible connections between ASMR, misophonia and synaesthesia (synaesthetes often have an inter-sensory experience – for example they might find numbers are represented by colours). I’ve been encouraging her to look into the misokinesia connection as well, because I sometimes have a very physical reaction to certain movements other people make.

On one occasion I almost fell over when someone across the street made a noise and pointed sharply at something near me. I was 12 or 13 years old at the time and felt (and probably looked!) ridiculous. The funny thing is I couldn’t help it, it was if I was being physical jolted.

I’d be really interested to hear if anyone else suffers from misokinesia and if so, how it manifests itself.

As I write this I’m feeling pangs of irrational fury because I can see my work colleague to my left, pulling at his beard. His beard for goodness sake. Hand me the blinkers…

410 Comments

  1. Rachel

    Yes, I have noticed this as well. It doesn’t affect me as much as misophonia, but I have noticed it. I remember my first experience with it was in 2nd grade. I was at school and a girl to my left was constantly running her fingers over her eyelashes. I was getting annoyed by it and felt my heart beating heavily. I remember even telling her to stop a few times. Of course, I was only met with a look of mere confusion for she didn’t even know what I was talking about.

    So, I went to talk to my sister about it, in search of a comfort that I wasn’t fully insane. That didn’t help. She seemed to make it worse, telling me that the girl wasn’t doing anything abnormal and I was over reacting.

    Which is why I love the Internet. After a horrid night at the dinner table in 7th grade, I looked online for a reason of my problems and up popped misophonia. It’s great to know that I’m not the only one with these problems and that I’m not crazy or insane.

    The other things I find irritating to my misokinesia is leg rubbing, fingernail cleaning, chewing, drinking, and nose rubbing.

    Thanks for sharing this! It is great to hear the stories of others and know that I’m not the only one suffering.

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Thanks for the comment Rachel! That’s really interesting. Those misokinesia triggers all get me as well, except perhaps for the leg rubbing – although I don’t think I know anyone who does that thankfully. Of course now I’ve said that they’ll be at least 4,000 people on the train home rubbing their legs and driving me insane…

      Reply
      • Maggie

        I am a sufferer of misophonia and also get agitated at people fidgeting. My mother always played with her hair and I had to hide behind a chair so I couldn’t see her. My husband had a habit of rubbing his nose all the time. I felt really stupid asking him to stop. I thought the hate of fidgeting was the brain translating it into sounds, I didn’t know it had a name.

        Reply
        • Cherish

          Ughh I can’t stand it when people play with their hair too!! My sister always twirls her hair constantly and it drives me insane

          Reply
          • Marla

            Yes! The hair twirling is by far one of the worsts triggers for me…especially when they take the time to part out the little piece they are going to twiddle between their fingers. Worst thing EVER!

          • Mary

            My daughter does the hair curling thing too and equally drives me out of my mind. Loud noises do not bother me as much as peoples mannerisms i.e tooth picking, the way they hold a fork, throat clearing etc.

        • Amberlyn Stock

          i never knew this was real. i’ve always thought I was a weird child for being annoyed at little things such as a repetitive action. i’ve been suffering from this since I was around 3 or 4. my mom would be fidgeting with her fingers and I would get really angry, I would tell her she can’t do that. my family thought I was a control freak and kept telling me “you need to stop that.” as much as I tried, I couldn’t. every time someone would chew/fidget I would get irritated almost over the top. i still struggle to not blow a nut at someone because they do these things. It bothers me that I can’t be a normal person and just let it go.

          Reply
          • Frances Wallace

            Don’t be! I have dyslexic and am ADHD both I didn’t know till I was 50! I just thought I was stupid! Along with that mix in Misophonia and Misokinesia! I have thought I would blow my mind! Sounds! Legs giggling! Reperttion! Omg! People that this doesn’t effect don’t have a clue the pain and panic they cause!

          • Deb

            I am 51 yrs old, have suffered this my whole life & just learned this disorder has been identified. I too, just thought I was crazy & how can you explain the rage inside of you when you’re triggered? The good thing is we are not alone. And more research is being done to treat it. So far my family is very understanding. Hugs to you & I wish you the best with coping.

          • Lee

            Everything I do bothering my bf. Noise of me doing anything? If I’m not sitting still? If I get up ALOT and move throughout the room.
            But loud tv and music don’t bother him ? What’s his problem? He talks loud.

        • Name

          My friend always twirled her hair and I can’t stand it. I’ve asked her to stop and she just seems insulted.

          Reply
        • William

          Started a while ago probably earlier than I realized but at night when I was about to sleep, I would hear my vent crackling and the metal components shaking. While I was tuning all the other sounds around me out, I could only hear the sudden clanks of the metal vent when everything was quiet and was about to falls asleep.

          Reply
      • Baldy McDove

        Oh my goodness thank you so much. I needed so badly to read this tonight. I have developed a horrible reaction to my partner massaging her shoulders, the noise and visual makes me want to scream and I hate feeling this way. It makes me feel like such a monster but less so to know other people experience the same thing. Thank you!

        Reply
      • Janet Duggan

        I only found out last week that what I have has a name.
        I am 64 and for as long as I can remember I hate any repetitive sounds, clicking, tapping, whistling, any continual sound or movement. I have been reading all the comments to see if anyone hates the sound of liquid coming out of a bottle, like pouring wine, water etc. I cannot concentrate on anything when I hear a repetitive sound.
        Twirling hair, noisy eaters also annoy. But any continuous sound drives me mad.

        Reply
        • Frances

          Your not crazy! I was so happy to know there was a name for sounds and movements that drive me crazy!

          Reply
          • Walt

            Am the only one that can’t tolerate the sound of “T’s” and “D’s” at the end of a word? It drives me mad enough to sabotage my own social life, and never talk to people. I really hate this about myself

        • EE

          Yes, I find the liquid pouring sound very annoying, particularly when it is portrayed prominently in e.g. a commercial. Normal water flowing does not bother me, only when it’s being poured as part of a human ritual. It’s like they’re purposely adding a flourish to make it seem extra indulgent or something. It always sounds to me like the person is showing off and purposely doing it.

          Reply
      • Andra

        I also suffer from this issue. Repetitive sound and movement can raise my irritability monitor from 0-60 in a very short time. I have the extra added joy of also being sensitive to certain fabrics touching my skin. Pant seams and nylons are especially troublesome. Anyone who says Yoga pants are comfortable is insane in my view as I am ready to tear them off halfway through a class. I often comment I just want to be naked all the time. Sigh…. I use humour to brush it off, but it can be hard to deal with everyday situations. Nice To know I’m not crazy, but it would be nice to have some relief. Pets and children making noises or repetitive movements does not affect me the same way an adult human doing the thing does. Odd disorder to say the least.

        Reply
        • Rose

          Pant seams,nylons, cheap fabrics, tight clothing,especially underwear. Can’t deal with it. Go to a warm climate every winter to get away from bundling up and blankets. Just thinking about all the stuff that drives me crazy drives me crazy this includes misophonia and misokinesia which I just discovered.

          Reply
        • Leslie

          I know right? Young children or someone who is handicapped or I am aware of their innocence, so to speak, does not bother me. If it is an adult, someone who should know better then I’m off the charts annoyed or I get so angry that I have to leave the same room they are in. The worst thing lately is, I love my husband so very much but he has developed a new habit. He rubs his legs or moves his thumb back and forth. The Repetitiveness is driving me to a point that I’m fearing that I will lash out at him and he will never understand that it is really a problem for me. Has anyone found a cure or come up with a means of being able to cope?

          Reply
      • Elizabeth Regen

        Wow!!! I’ve never read anything that addressed these issues seriously! I am and have always been so bothered by sound and movement to the point where it makes me cry. If someone is whistling while standing near me- I just keep staring at them thinking they should know that no one wants to hear them. If someone is jingling change in there pocket- it makes me feel Full of rage. If someone is humming- omg! Playing the drums on a desk???!! I remember when we were in HS my BFF used to sleep over my house on the weekends and when we were going to sleep she would rub her feet together – she said she was a “self soother!” I told her she could not self soothe around me!!!! I first noticed this about myself when I was about 8- and my younger brother was 4- he would make airplane noises with his toys- or a Robot voice and I would yell at him to STOP. I remember it making me cry. I can remember my mom saying “What’s wrong with you he’s just playing with his toys!” It’s actually very hard to live with this! Is there help?

        Reply
        • Sharon

          OMG reading your comment was like you had read my mind, Iv been told i’m very intolerant and impatient. How can you possibly tolerate someone jingling change, whistling or humming? Iv actually had to ask strangers to stop doing those things as the more it goes on the more the pressure in my head increases until I feel like the top of my head with blow off. Im not sure when I first became aware of it as I feel like I have always had it, it never helped that my brother is a “tapper” he taps desks, cup handles with his wedding ring, seems like anything he can get near. My partner is a VERY NOISY eater, its getting to the stage where I find excuses to eat at different times or places, he also has a very dry cough that drives me mad, its really affecting my relationship as I find it very annoying and he thinks im very intolerant, but I really cannot help it…. its all I can hear,it makes me feel sick and I can feel the anxiety building to the point that I sometimes feel I could lash out to make the “offender” stop doing what they are doing will make the noise stop. I am 48 and feel like this is getting worse, and due to this find myself telling other people off, or telling them what do do/not do, I’m positive I have lost friends over this as they find me overbearing, bossy and intollerant : (

          Reply
        • Rhonda Evans

          My doctor prescribed 100mg of Bupropion, which helps reduce the amount of time I notice annoying sounds. Doesn’t eliminate it. It helps if I eat at the same time as my husband, I don’t hear the sounds when I eat at the same time.

          Reply
        • Nora Jarquin

          It’s truly remarkable to be able to read all of this and know I’m not alone. I am the only person I know who has misophonia and misokinesia and it’s getting to a point where my relationship with my mom is suffering. She is my main trigger. She has a mental disorder where she cannot stop pulling her hair and she constantly is rubbing her teeth up against her lips along with licking her lips. It is so aggrivating to me that I can tell when she is going to do those movements and I have to look away to keep myself from completely lashing out. I am trying to decide what treatment is best for me.

          Reply
        • Sheryl

          Hi Elizabeth, I thought I was the only one that when other people whistle I can’t stand it. I am 66 and this has been happening since I was a child. I am so glad to see someone else shares the same issues. Someone humming makes me mad too. I give the person dirty looks as if they have no right to hum or whistle. I know they do but the sound just is so ear piercing and annoying to me. My husband picks his cuticles. Can’t stand that either. Someone cracking gum bothers me. I hope I hear back from you again so we can talk about our annoyances. Lol

          Reply
        • Jean Murphy

          All the above and esp people circling their thumbs around each other rapidly I suffer from both and it got a lot worse after my fathers death.My family find it very hard to deal with and used to be very unsupportive explaining it’ is real condition has helped

          Reply
          • Marshmallow

            Oh my GOSH! I HATE the thumb circling too! It feels like such a relief to know I’m not alone in this very specific trigger.

        • Bo

          My daughter, at 5 years old, unbeknownst to the rest of the family had Miokoniesa and was always complaining about anyone making repetitive moves or chewing gum. I told her she needed to get over it and I’d do it on purpose just to try to help her get over it. She would leave the room. She hates me to this day. She’s now 41 yrs old.

          Reply
      • Rose

        Hi, it’s almost end of 2018 and I came across this article. Has anyone found any treatments for misophonia and misokinesia? My husband has both for almost 50 years and so far we haven’t found anyone who knows how to treat them. Thanks.

        Reply
    • Cherry

      Is there a way of overcoming it? I want help badly because of it i have turned into a kind of person who always tells other people what to do!
      And deep down i feel real bad about it but i just cant help it!

      Reply
    • Amy

      Oh snap I didn’t realise this was an actual thing. I get annoyed at people around me all the time who are constantly rubbing their hands together or flicking their legs whilst everyone else is nonchalant. I thought that maybe there was something wrong with me – but, come to think of it, these things have only seemed to annoy me within the last couple of years. So I wonder if it is brought on by something and if it can be overcome…

      Reply
      • Amber

        I CANNOT stand when someone flicks their legs! OMG I thought I was the only one. My mom always does it and when I go to class I try to sit where I can’t see anyone’s legs. Mainly females because they just love to do that crap. I get so aggravated! Sometimes I’m even telling myself I don’t want to be friends with them because it’s just that annoying! Glad to see I’m not completely crazy and alone in this weird pet peeve!

        Reply
        • Ladybyrd1980

          I Cried Reading this, I’m assuming when u say flicks their legs You mean the Obvious kicking air over n over, My mate does this he shakes his feet side to side to the point he’s rocking me as well And I Get HIGHLY ANNOYED then his feelings are hurt, And leg rubbing I get.but when people rub my legs or anywhere repeatedly, and in a fast motion Or Rubs My head like um a freakin dog I go Mad and I obsess over why something so small that sooo many other people tolerate drive me insane like this. Its Really bothersome so I prefer to be alone most times

          Reply
          • Terri Brammer

            Yesterday was the first time that I even heard of Misophonia/Misokinesia. I have had several issues with this and wildly searched if it had a name. I do love people but have been triggered by their repetitive behavior to the point that I feel anger and even disgust! Yesterday while putting together some disaster relief meals with friends for flooding victims here in Nebraska, I blew up in front of everyone. My husband in the background leaving the frig open long enough to hear the ding ding ding….a very loud person laughing at everything. My husband saying um every 5 words…crumbling paper…finally I yelled at everyone.and I wanted to run away! In shame I apologized and talked to my husband about the things he does all the time that are repetitive and drive me crazy. Poor guy..he has short term memory loss and is getting almost deaf to boot. So it makes ”ME” HAVE TO REPEAT EVERTHING OVER AND KVER AND OVER! I love him and I want to be able to help him not criticize him. I’m looking for more info on what natural remedies are out there. If I have to watch him wipe his hands after every bite of popcorn again I may just go mad! Just sayin.

    • Christine Chant

      I have Misophonia too and I find lots of things really iritating, mainly people doing things with their hands that are un-nessesary, ie running hands through their hair, tapping their fingers, when my husband reads the paper he pulls the pages, smooths them, runs his fingers over the creases to fold them neater, rattles the pages and sort of rubs his bits through his clothes as he reads, whilst he is relaxing with the paper I sit there getting very tense and iritated, now I realise its not just me being intollerant, its an actual ‘thing’

      Reply
    • Andrew

      I heard about this condition yesterday on the radio.
      I was amazed it was as though somebody was describing me.
      I just thought it was normal to hate certain noises and gestures.
      My biggest triggers are the sound of eating and drinking but worse is the sound people make when they click their nails or cut them.
      Both the sound and sight of it drives me into a rage. The strange thing is I am 49 and this only developed about ten years ago.
      I was in my work van with a colleague who was picking dirt from under his nails.
      Straight away it infuriated me and I asked him to stop.
      He found it amusing and carried on.
      I actually threatened him with violence stopped the van and told him to get out drove away and left him.
      Needless to say he didn’t do it again.
      My partner and children know not to make these sounds or gestures in front of me
      I actually left my former partner because I could not endure the sound she made when she ate
      In a way I’m glad that it’s an actual condition despite the fact there seems little I can do about it.
      Any suggestions or comments would be appreciated

      Reply
      • Moe

        I feel your anguish. I broke with a very sweet and kind boyfriend because he breathed to loud through his nose and mouth. Grunted while he ate and had to make some type of noise when he moved like getting up from a chair or bending over etc. He sounded like he weighed 500 lbs like it was a huge struggle. He was fairly normal weight so it didn’t justify the sounds which that drove me insane. Smacking his mouth, moving his lips while he read, dear God I just couldn’t do it any longer. I am much happier now. Silence is golden to me. Although when I go visit my mother she has a clock on the wall that tic, tocs wayyyyy to much! lol
        I’m working on breathing and rethinking my brain to say, these people are not here to torture me. That helps a little.

        Reply
        • Anonymous

          I’m pittied you but also think it is funny. Poor the boyfriend but i think i also will do the same thing for my own comfort. I will try to survey a partner before i married them.

          Reply
      • Ladybyrd1980

        Thank You, All Of You guys for sharing this, U hit home when You said Your Children and spouse know better than to do certain things. Toe nails, hair shavings, I hate when people have there disgusting napkins on the table,They only get one chance and its stupid but I fight but the urge wins. I will start my research…
        Yeah To top it All off I’m An August Virgo…

        Reply
    • ruth

      I cannot stand when people whistle through their teeth. Can. Not. Stand. Regular whistling bothers me, but whistling through teeth honestly makes me want to kill myself. Other triggers are pen clicking, nail/cuticle biting, and one that really drives me crazy is when my husband sucks on the tips of his glasses; it literally makes my lips vibrate/itch/ache when he does it. I also hate any music with a steady drumbeat. I find loud drums incredibly distracting. I always just thought I was a bad, evil person for being so easily annoyed. I do like to stay home alone where I can control my environment. Oddly, a ticking clock does not always bother me. When an animal or a small child causes a trigger, I have a much less pronounced reaction than if it comes from an adult. Something about feeling that someone should know better makes it worse. Lucky for me, I have very poor peripheral vision. Otherwise who knows how crazy I would be?

      Reply
      • Missy

        I could be in a store and as soon as I hear a kid throwing a fit I have to leave. Also the stores out there that have their music pumped up I told a manager one time is this a store or a dance club. He didn’t like it too much.

        Reply
        • Meredith

          I understand about the the kids crying in stores, I’m like doesn’t that bother anybody else around me?

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        • Serena

          Maybe I’m not a total freak after all…since around the age of 9 I’ve had misophobia and misokinesia and did not know that until today! I’d convinced myself it must be a mild form of autism, despite having no other symptoms. I left school and home aged 16 because my father was unable to sit still – he fidgeted all of the time. Then I married a man who fidgets so much I can’t sit in the same room for any length of time. Aargh!

          Reply
      • Kathryn Richardson

        Wow! That is crazy. I thought I was bad XD My biggest agitation is my fiance jiggling his knee. To this day he hasn’t broke the habit after me always having to end up telling him to stop multiple times a day.. It gives me worse anxiety than I’ve ever felt from any ANYTHING else (and I’m a long term anxiety sufferer already).
        Second would be dogs licking themselves. Especially the SOUND. That can be the most sudden onset anxiety that I’ve ever felt at times.
        Other things like coughing, sneezing, anything involving toenails except my own, bag rustling, anything like that and repetitive, can really get on my nerves, but not nearly as bad. And it always stops happening right before I have to ask them to stop…
        Cause really?!
        “Could you stop coughing?”
        “Could you stop opening that bag up?”
        “Could you stop sneezing?”
        I guess I’d get to a point to avert the situation.

        Reply
        • Nona Mouse

          If he still hasn’t broken the habit, then it’s probably a thing that he really can’t consciously control. Just try to remember he’s not doing it AT you, no more than you are having a reaction to it AT him.

          Reply
      • Ladybyrd1980

        Yeees,,, I Am Extremely tolerant with Children && the elderly but folks I feel should “Know Better ” There is No Mercy… poor them… But people like Me,,,, Those who know me know,,, But Baby,,, You can ef up my whole day with these itty bitty things that make nerves in my face n other parts of my body twitch… Solo Dolo

        Reply
    • Nancy Taylor

      No one has talked about the person at home, or guest ( relative ) visiting the home or some one in our work force has to sneeze so, so, so loud it blows me over…. it is ridiculous and not necessary…. it does startle people and of course the snapping of gum, or playing with their fingers that make a noise….. the people in the movie theatre who are making noises with their water bottles, their wrapping package that has candy inside, ….. my husband goes crazy when I am so startled and nearly have a heart attack when these noises make me jolt, make me CRAZY….. I find it because they are seeking attention… also people at work who push their chair in making the noise of dragging it and not lifting it… or people who make that noise from moving a table down the way… I would have someone near by lift it to create a quiet atmosphere while people are talking, working or just reading… ABSOLUTELY UNNECESSARY>.. I still say it is attention seeking and nothin more… There is also a certain culture group that bend over with their nose almost at their plate and slurping or making some kind of ridiculous noise to eat their meal…. sheesh… I say it is because they are not using the proper tools that will hold it much easier than it dropping off the sticks…. grrrrrgh!!!!!!!!! Makes me crazy!

      Reply
      • Rachel

        I hate fidgeting, repetitive movements, etc – they make me feel sick – but I couldn’t disagree more about “unnecessary sneezing”. I frequently have sneezing fits and I do not enjoy them at all. I can well understand that others may dislike them, and I always apologise. But I can’t control them. I do think we need to be less condemning of people whose behaviours cause bad reactions in us.

        Reply
      • Nona Mouse

        Yeah, no. As a loud sneezer (who has not completely controllable allergies yet) I can assure you that if it was possible for me to sneeze quietly, I absolutely would. And since stifling a powerful sneeze can actually be harmful, there is no way I’m going to do that on anyone’s behalf, no matter WHAT kind of reaction my sneeze triggers in them.
        And the people making the noises that trigger you? They are just living their lives, not “seeking attention”, FFS. Most people quite honestly do not notices these types of noises or gestures AT ALL, or if they do, are not bothered by them. That you have a disorder that causes certain noises/gestures to be irrationally irritating does not mean those people are doing them AT you, purposely for attention, or any other sinister/selfish reason you want to come up with.
        Those of us with misophonias, sensory processing disorders, sensory defensiveness, etc – WE are the odd ones out, and WE are the ones that have to learn how to live in a world where we are affected by people doing normal, innocuous, everyday, things. And if you continue to view people’s normal, innocuous, everyday actions in such an uncharitable light, then all you are going to do is make yourself more miserable than you ever need to.

        Reply
    • hailey

      Hi! I am 16 years old and I have already been diagnosed with misophonia by my doctor, along with a few other disorders. I have noticed I get extremely irritated, close to tears, disgusting, etc… when I see people bite their nails, fidget at all with their hands, play with their hair, shake their feet, the movement of someone chewing, and so many more. I am in high school and this is probably the worst time to be experiencing this. It isn’t just pet peeves i have, it causes me so much anxiety to where i have to leave class to cry. It confuses me so much. I hadn’t been able to pinpoint a word to describe my extreme detest against watching certain motions. Nobody understands it. It frustrates me to know that nobody understands it, but as i read the other comments it gives me some sort of relief. I wish there was more of a light on mental disorders because people who don’t experience them don’t understand how life altering they are. Because of my disorder I have to test in the halls to stay focused, can’t eat with certain people, can’t sit next to certain people, cannot attend movie theaters or things of that realm, etc… I have had an endless amount of people not belief me and ask for proof i have misophonia, and it sucks because they try to tell me its not real. Experiencing this disorder is truly awful, it affects me in so many ways and i wish i could figure out someway to help myself. My mom has suggested therapy for me, but she suggests it because of my other issues i deal with on a day to day basis. I need to figure this out. Any feedback would be absolutely amazing!!! Thank you!

      Reply
      • Karen

        Hi Hailey , my name is Karen and I’m 56 years old so far out of school, but I understand . I never knew our life complications had a name until recently so I’m glad to find this community. Therapy , sure , why not ? But , over many years of dealing with this I’ve found the absolute best medicine is physical movement either outside ( be safe , no walking in dangerous areas or at night ) or even a gym . Even though there are sounds /smells ( which I taste , that’s my other issue ) they are often not repetitive or rhythmic so they blend rather that overwhelm. Yoga also really helps although I don’t know why . Remember, you’re not crazy or bad , your brain is just a little more active than most people and that’s a good thing .
        Take care ,
        K .

        Reply
        • Ladybyrd1980

          OMGoodness…..
          I’ve never actually heard anyone else say that they taste smells,,, It’s a blessing and a curse, I get nauseous easily I have to have certain salty and sweet things around to keep me from vomiting. Most likely Baking Soda to curve the nausea and then like a fruit punch fruitie or now n later to keep it down both followed by ice cold water. WeirdO… my entire life

          Reply
      • Anna

        Hi hailey! I just turned 15, and I’m going through the exact same thing as you. It’s such a horrible thing to have in high school, and no one in my family understands, they just yell at me.

        Reply
      • Alex

        Hi I am almost 14 and for the past 2-3 years I’ve had these symptoms. Noisy eating drives me mad to the point where I’m in tears. There’s also a noise my dad makes when he has a cold, sniffing and then clicking/scratching his throat. It angers me so much that I self harm. My mum scratches her face and taps her leg so when she comes home I avoid her. It’s sad that for the rest of my life I won’t be able to spend time with my family without getting distressed or screaming

        Reply
        • Janet

          I can’t stand the following noises made by other people: chewing food or gum, gulping liquids, whistling, humming, grunting, sighing, sniffing noise, clearing throat sounds, sighing. I also can’t stand the sound of someone that has a lisp when they talk.

          Reply
      • Natalie

        I can relate to your comment 120%. I’m 19 years old and dealt with the same thing… I’d like to talk with you because I’ve felt like no one believes me or truly understands me. Is there any way we can talk privately?

        Reply
      • .

        i always thought that it was just something stupid i’ll have to deal with i’ve had multiple people call me crazy. Some of the main triggers are like people shaking their feet or having their hand in front of their mouth or even just like people say with their mouths open! I have to physically put a barrier between me and them as to not see them but before i put the barrier i have to like push their hand away and tell them to stop and then put the barrier so it’s almost like i got the last word, i know that sounds wierd probably. I always mimick people either verbally or physically as to stop myself from bursting out crying which i normally do anyways but it’s like i’m so angry that i can’t even cry because i’m that angry. Honestly sometimes i sorta wished that i was deaf in that moment rather than being in the scenario

        Reply
        • Melissa W.

          I know exactly how you feel.. You especially got me when you said that in those moments you wished you were deaf. I sadly have wished I was deaf too in those moments of rage. I also have misokinesia and have wished I was blind before too. In this moment… I wish they would find a treatment already and end our suffering.

          Reply
      • Nona Mouse

        Also, it’s not a “mental disorder”, it’s a neurological one.

        Reply
    • Chris

      I just noticed tonight that my friend during chorus rehearsal was bothering me so much that I had to get up and move to another seat. I can’t imagine what she must have thought. I didn’t want to be rude to her by barking at her, “Could you please stop that? It’s really annoying and gross! You don’t come to chorus rehearsal to stroke your hair and comb it with your fingers the entire night in search of split ends! I can’t think of anything more disgusting! Next thing I know you’ll be sticking the small strips of hair you are inspecting in your mouth! What’s wrong with you? Enough is enough already! We all touch our hair once in a while, but this is ridiculous. You won’t stop! Didn’t you wash your hair? Haven’t you noticed that you have extremely frizzy and long hair? You should be inspecting the knots in your hair at home before coming to rehearsal!!!!!!”

      I didn’t want to say this to my friend because I’m there to make friends not enemies. The best I could do was get up and move, which I felt wasn’t very nice. Another thing she does is glance over at me while I’m singing or taking notes in my music. I feel like covering my page with my arm the way kids do to keep their neighbors from cheating from off their papers during a school test.

      I will need to read more on this. I also can’t watch my beautiful daughter eat. I feel like ants are crawling all over me and I can’t stand the sound. During holiday family meals, I have to place a large flower arrangement at the center of the table to block the view of my husband while he eats. I can’t stand it. It makes me want to scream.

      I guess there really is something “wrong” with me. All this time I thought it was them. I also can’t stand hearing people talk on cell phones in public either. I makes me feel irrate. I feel like saying, “Shut the F up! I’m here to relax, not hear you schmooze business over your phone!!!!”

      Reply
      • Julie M

        Chris, people playing with their long hair is my worst visual trigger, and I have many. The way you describe your reaction is spot-on! Glad to hear I’m not the only one, but sorry so many of us have this condition.

        Reply
        • Nona Mouse

          I’ve never actually understood why some people get so angry/freaked out by people who play with their hair (my hair is usually way too short for twiddling so, Not Me) but as part of a misophonia related disorder, it makes perfect sense now.

          Reply
      • Heidi

        I am 53 years old and it is finally nice to know I’m not alone and what I’m feeling isn’t because I’m “high maintenance” or “intolerant”. There are many noises that I can’t stand but the top of my list is: Excessive talking! Large group when everyone is talking and laughing, a single person who speaks loudly and never shuts-up, I DETEST most TV! Shows such as “The View” leaves me in a rage!If I was to be tortured that show would just be played over and over again!Cell phones needless to say have just about done me in. I’m a firm believer in good manners and proper etiquette. That combined with the talking issue makes me livid. I have thrown so many murderous looks at people in public, left stores, made comments to people, etc. What I’d really like to do is yell “Everyone shut the F*** Up!” But that would be bad manners….:) My adult daughter was very athletic child. I did enjoy going to her games but at home she would be talking to me always with some sort of ball in hand either dribbling, tossing, bouncing and she learned pretty quickly NOT to do that. The ticking clock I find rather soothing for some reason. When my daughter and son-in-law spend the night I have to take it out of the guest room though. My son-in-law can’t sleep with that ticking. Every morning my husband slurps his coffee. I’ve never said a word because he is the kindest most loving man and I know it’s my issue but after more than 25 years of marriage I still feel anger when it happens. Just nice to know I’m not alone!!

        Reply
        • Mary

          Gosh Heidi, it’s my wonderful husband that triggers me too. Slurping coffee, passing gas at both ends all day, his constant snacking. I have to leave the room. What a horrible disorder this is.

          Reply
        • Nona Mouse

          I CANNOT STAND the noise of television, at all, except if I am actually watching something I am interested in (VERY rare) nor can I deal with listening to just talking on the radio for any extended length of time.

          On the other hand, I’ve almost dozed off in the MRI machine before. Such a weird disorder.

          Reply
      • Mary

        Chris…You sound just like me. I just found out about Misophonia and now believe it’s a disorder that seems to affect millions of people. I am 74 female and have had this all my life it seems. Now perhaps I can learn more and get help.

        Reply
      • Janine

        Oh my,you are me!!!…my husband irritates the life out of me EVERYDAY it drives me insane he now even makes disgusting noises while NOT eating,he’s got worse as time gone by he’s 69 so there’s no chance of changing him ,I would like to walk out and never go back but at my age can’t start again

        Reply
      • None Mouse

        Cell phones: even people without misophonia are irritated by loud talkers on cell phones.
        BUT, there is actually a very valid reason so many people talk way too loud on a cell.

        A regular landline phone feeds the speakers voice back to them through the speaker of the handpiece, which allows them to regulate their voices to a moderate level. Before this was done, people yelled into those kinds of phones too.

        I really wish cell technology would come up with a way to deal with this so public cell phone yellers can become a thing of the past.

        Reply
      • Note Ellen

        Same same same!!! Cell phone talk. Also Nail clipping, people sighing, whistling, to name a few more…..

        Reply
    • Fran Lake

      Hi, I can’t handle when people continuely have to have their shoe halfway off and shake it like a flip flop or men usually shake their leg constantly drives me nuts I’d like to go shake them

      Reply
      • Teri

        Ha! Have you ever seen Kimberley on The Five on Fox News?
        OMG, she does this and drives me crazy so I stopped watching.

        Reply
    • Alexis

      Ive dealt with this all of my life and I’ve become isolated. I really pray that a treatment will be found soon because I’m tired of dealing with it!

      Reply
    • evelyn

      I am extremely irritated if I notice someone chewing gum when I am on the bus. The motion of the moving jaw is hideous to me and I have to avoid looking in that direction.

      Reply
      • B

        Evelyn I could not agree more about the jaw motion. I always remember Angela from My So-Called Life watching her parents chew saying “I mean, if you stop to think about, like, chewing — what it really is — how people just do it, like, in public.” Hahaha helps put my disgust into words.

        Reply
    • Inquisitive atom

      Yes this is me too. Ever since I was 15 or maybe even 12 I started having issues with my Mom swallowing, noises in school like tapping, coughing that made want to strangle them, and even my watch that ticked while I was taking a test. It made me disoriented. It was weird after I turned 15 I was angry a lot, but that wasn’t the real problem. The real one was every sound started to get really loud. I’d have to cover my ears when people moved dishes around and would literally fall to the floor when I was touched. It was weird because I’ve never been that way. At 14 it was just people touching my shoulder to get my attention and by 18-19 and still now at 20, I can’t stand being touched slight movements put me on edge. Like I have to fight or something. Even lights on cars passing by feel like they’re in my face. If someone at work flicks a bag near me it makes my body feel like it hit me. And I literally jolt away like I was pushed when anyone moves near me. I used to react to sounds or touch by screaming which turned into throwing any object I was holding. Even someone saying my name at a normal volume makes me jolt or scream. I hate freaking people out and trying to make them conform, so I just keep it inside. But the beeping sounds at work on our headsets is starting to drive me insane.luckily the sounds aren’t constant or I’d be a wreck. I still feel overwhelming anger when someone makes noises filling ice or someone says um or ah too much which I just found out are triggers of Misophonia. I recently found out about this name and just now about misokinesa. It blew my mind. One question does it give you headaches or feel like someone is pounding your eardrums when you hear sounds. It does in my ears and it hurts. Do you relate?

      Reply
    • Lisa

      I can not stand seeing chewing whether I can hear it or not. If I can’t hear it it’s like I’m waiting to hear the first chomping sounds and I can concentrate on nothing else and I also can’t stand foot shaking I think I could chop somebody’s foot off and it annoys me and it does sicken me

      Reply
    • Danielle colinns

      Everytime my dad slurps or taps or I hear the sound of breathing under a microphone and next to me I have this firing rage inside of me. I always consulted my self-thinking I don’t have ADHD or add nor do i have autism and this article helped me understand my disorder. In school, I would pull out my hair or clench my hands to not make it obvious but at home, i let it all out making me a victim of something unknown. Thank you so much! I think my parents would doubt it but at least I know whats wrong with me.

      Reply
    • Rebecca

      I have noticed this my misophonia has been going on since I was about 5 and I feel so bad for my sister I screamed at her and no one else because no one else wouldn’t hit me if I did but I noticed the misokinesis about 2 years ago when I was 10 I was in a car and in a car in the lane next to us someone was chewing and it was obvious to me there could be no sound involved but I was almost in tears because of it.my friend also rubs his lip and it makes me feel almost nauseous . Does anyone else get this feeling?

      Reply
    • Rhonda Raglin

      Hello everyone! I’m so grateful that I am not the only one that suffers from this disorder. When I was a child it was loud smacking and chewing that would almost have me in tears. As I’ve gotten older, it’s gotten worst. My husband thinks that I hate eveiabout him . It annoys me when he smacks, drink and make the refreshing sound. When he twirls his feet. When he walks without picking up his feet.. how do I fix this disorder?

      Reply
      • EE

        Lol Rhonda, I know exactly what you mean by “the refreshing sound”. I HATE it. It’s like “Do you have no self-control? Do you just make orgasm noises in public too? Or let a big fart rip? Because that’s basically what you’re doing.”

        Reply
    • ava Bowers

      I’m so happy right now! I thought I was the ONLY one who had this probably! I cried about it every night because I hated going to school! EVERYONE annoys me by sniffling, clicking, taping, breathing loud, coughing to moving OR SHAKING THEIR LEGS!! I cried so much because it bother me so so so so bad! I always knew I was annoyed by sounds since 2 or 3rd grade when kids make tapping noises with pens or highlighters and I say “stop” they don’t and just do it louder and never stop! But I rlly noticed it in 7th grade!! Oh my god it was HORROBLE I hated it! I moved my seat everywhere to find a place to not get annoyed and I told teachers and nothing help. I did notice being in the front of the class HELP A LOT BETTER and I always put my hand around my eyes when I am at school so I only see my work and nothing else. But sadly I still see everyone moving their legs! ALSO the most IMPORTANT thing I use are some noise canceling silicone earplugs! I wear there almost the whole day at school! School isn’t good but but without them I wouldn’t even believe it. School so hard and I’m in 8th grade right now but I’m so scared because everything it just getting more annoying and I can’t control it! Everyone just says to me “your crazy” “get over it” “it isn’t annoying” “no” “omg” “what” or “I don’t care” when I asked them to stop makeing that noise or movement and I just want to sit at my desk and cry because I cant hold it back. I just want it to go away and it is just taking away my life. I just don’t knot what to do anymore. I wish there were pills. My life will be so much better 🙁 but I always sleep with my music on to let out noise I wear noise proof head phones, earplugs, and basically anything u could think of, I even have a noise machine. It helps a lot, but nothing can get me over it, i hope it goes away soon ? but it won’t. I have to just deal with it, but no one knows how hard it is.

      Reply
      • Misty

        Hi Ava,
        I’m 38 years old and was lucky that in my teens, only food sounds bothered me. In college and afterwards my misophonia expanded to forceful typing being one of my biggest triggers. I try to meditate and exercise regularly to lessen it. Hang in there, thanks for sharing your experience, and know that there is a growing community of us to touch base with. I’m optimistic that research will find some ways to help us.

        Reply
    • Leslie C

      I feel your pain but didn’t discover what my “problem” was until I was 65 years old. For years I thought I was mean, impatient, intolerant and overly critical of others. Misophoinia is most bothersome, but my sister runs her fingers over her eyelashes as you describe and my best friend chews on his tongue and both of those movements drive me insane.

      Reply
    • Abi

      Yet another thing to add to the ever-growing and considerably long list of my conditions and disorders
      I think at this point it’s like 11 things long
      I’m 14 years old and I almost have a mental issue for every year I’ve been alive

      Reply
    • Faith Smith

      FINALLY light has been shed! I thought I was an awful person for not being able to tolerate particular sounds and repetitive movements from others and particular environments. I was researching why much of what my significant other does (silly sounds he feels the needs to make on a regular basis and constant thumping his fingers…among other things) has made me question whether or not I could remain in our relationship. It’s not just him, for I cannot read or focus on the content with noise like the tv or radio or others speaking. I crave a quiet environment. Crowds and people getting too closely to me trigger panic. I am a 55 year old woman. I want so much to cope but haven’t figured out a way yet. I could not ask to be treated better by anyone, but my sweetie doesn’t seem to understand my dilemma. I prefer to drive in silence. He has to have the radio loud. I need a fan to drown out the noise to sleep and he doesn’t get it. I live in the country to get away from the noise of the city, and he’s lived his whole life in the city on a busy street. He also has a bit of hearing loss due to working around loud machinery, leading to a constant hum of some sort. He’s explained his reasons and I understand them. But he seems to not grasp my sensitivity to the distractions. I’ve struggled in the work environment due to the distractions of talking and loud voices. My computer job requires me to read and reread material. I constantly have to start over to grasp the content.
      When I’m in a public setting at a school function, at the movies, or in a restaurant and someone is talking loudly or whispering, after a while I have to ask the person to either stop or lower his or her voice.

      I would do anything to not be bothered by sounds/noise and movements. I hope to find out more about this and what I can do to cope better. I can’t change everyone else. This is my problem. Thank you for sharing your story. Bless you!

      Reply
    • Heather

      Replying here because I simply can’t scroll to the bottom only to find no way to reply. I have yelled at my mother and others for eating loudly. I have also yelled at others for fidgeting. In the car my boyfriend shakes his leg and it makes me nauseous. I always thought that was due to the movement of the car. Anyone fidgeting makes me nervous and almost angry. Noises literally drive me crazy. I mean like people eating drives me nuts. I can turn up the music in my car if someone is eating and it doesn’t matter. It’s like the sound of them eating is in my head. It’s getting worse. People on tv were eating or kissing and the noise was unbearable. I had never thought about the movement being connected. I have so many mental issues what’s a few more.

      Reply
  2. Nicole Harris

    Wow. I didn’t know this had a name! I’ve had misophonia since about late 2008-early 2009 (when I first noticed it, I was 18/19 and from there it has become so strong it has ruined relationships with family and friends). The past year or so I have noticed my reaction to sights getting worse and worse- the movement of my dad’s jaw when he eats, or the sight of my mom’s throat when she chews gum. She also uses an e-cig and between the puff and whizzing sounds from that and the SIGHT of her raising it to her lips I’ve about gone mad!

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Hi Nicole, I’m so sorry to hear that. You’re not alone and it will get easier. One thing I know for sure is that even though the sounds/visual triggers are horrible and at times unbearable, you can definitely develop coping mechanisms which will help. It took me a while to realise this, but if you’re feeling anxious or stressed (outside of the miso) it can make the triggers even worse… and then it gets into a vicious cycle of feeling stressed so you trigger and vice versa. So if you’re having a tough day, sometimes it’s best to find a way to be away from the situation when you start getting triggers – e.g. take a pretend phonecall or use the bathroom. I know it’s a lot harder if you’re living with your folks (that was the worst time for me) but it will get better.

      Reply
      • John

        I am 55 and wish I knew what this was I suffering with since as long as I remember. From the repetitive movements to the chewing ( Oh Please, Not With the Mouth Open!) to the tiniest movements or sounds, it comes and go’s.
        I have wanted to rip my ears out at times and I think over the years ( in reflection) I’ve used fans and loud machinery ( steady noise ) to drown out sound to the point that I am half deaf now.
        It is not as intense as it used to be. I think it comes and go’s with my blood pressure but lm not sure.
        Hopefully in the future this condition will be treatable but until then hang in their and keep trying different coping methods.

        Reply
        • John

          Also, there is a sound generator app. Called Mynoise that is well worth the ten bucks it has an endless amount of generators that you can adjust to your comfort level. This has done a lot to save my sanity. Really

          Reply
  3. T. Milnes

    Yes! I have this too! It’s gotten worse as I have gotten older. Can’t watch people chewing, can’t handle any movements in my periphial vision. I have to move positions or block it out with a hand or my hair. Going to the movies is the worst…do you know how many times people reach into their popcorn containers? I can’t sleep if the lights are off but the tv is on (my husband is watching). No flashing lights! And my kids fidget. A lot! It’s a wonder I’m still sane…..

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Interesting, I think mine’s gotten worse I’ve gotten older as well. I use the hand trick all the time (a well placed hand in head lean can do wonders). Cripes, cinemas are an absolute nightmare… even aside from he constant hand to mouth movements, it seems crazy that cinema food is amongst the loudest on the planet. They might as well sell klaxons.

      Reply
      • Cherry

        I am worried that my misophonia will worsen as i grow old, and i really dont want myself old in my bed, getting irritated by the sound of tap dripping water and then die!

        Reply
        • Melissa

          My misophonia and misokinesia have both gotten worse as I am getting older. I am now 36 years old and have had this as long as I can remember. It seems as I am getting older, I notice new things that start driving me mad that used to not bother me. The list just keeps getting bigger and bigger. It is very disturbing to know that we all will most likely have this for the rest of our lives. I know for myself, it affects my life greatly. I don’t want to leave my house, I have isolated myself, I have no friends, and I even push myself away from the one person in my life, my boyfriend. I have no family and am scared that I will leave him, because he drives me crazy all day with his moving of his feet and loud breathing and huffing sounds ALL DAY LONG!!!!! I wear ear plugs all day, but my ears are so raw inside, that I don’t know how much longer I can keep pushing them in my pussy, bloody, raw ears. But , I keep doing it, because I feel I will do and try anything so I don’t have to hear or see these things that are driving me insane. I’m at a loss here….. Sorry, I couldn’t be more encouraging. I pray that someday they will do more studies on this and give us some treatment options.

          Reply
          • A J Humpage

            Melissa, I wear earplugs a lot, too, and the ears can get sore, so sometimes I wear ear-defenders around the house. The kind you see men wearing on building sites. They mitigate the sound so it’s less intrusive and it will give the inside of your ears a rest. You may look a bit silly at first, but they will help alleviate the soreness left behind by constant use of earplugs. And such constant use can push earwax down the ear canal so it accumulates by the eardrum, making it harder to hear in the long run. Every misophonia sufferer should own a pair!

          • Melissa

            Thank you for your reply. I am definitely going to check them out! My ears are so raw and sore that it’s sad and I just keep pushing them little suckers in there every day. Every morning I even have dried up pussy stuff that comes out of my ears, I guess because there raw and they have scabs in them to. So, thank you! I needed an alternative!

          • Rosie

            Hi Melissa, I also wear earplugs almost 24/7 and was interested to hear that your ears get really sore. In case you don’t do this already or if there’s any chance that they’re getting infected from wearing the same plugs for a while, you can buy plugs in bulk cheap from eBay. I get 100 pairs at a time for about 10 quid and treat myself to a new pair every day!

          • julio jaramillo

            Circumaural headphones with music on are the best noise isolators I have found, sound is also transmitted through the bones of the face to the eardrum and this helps with that.

          • Melissa W.

            Thanks for the suggestion! I’m looking into in-ear white noise generators. They are so expensive though… But I’m saving up, as I think they will be worth the money. I hope anyway..

        • cj

          this is very interesting reading…. i myself believe in finding the center or root of anything ‘bad’ or ‘irritating’….
          humans are funny things…. we dont have issues with triggers that make us happy, but a ‘bad trigger’ makes us consider we are insane or different… i think a lot of us dont like the chewing or swallowing or fidgeting as for me its a germ issue….
          Just to be clear…. im not a germaphobe ( cant even spell it ;-)… ) but as a former chef… im aware of cross contamination and am aware of the tiny molecules and bizarre world within world theories etc etc that surround us…. so i am thinking of the germs that are been transferred from hair to mouth, or touching ones face etc etc…. as a child i remember my gran making ‘disgusting’ noises when i was a to young to say ”eat properly woman!!” so i believe that the irritation comes from when i was a child and lacked the ability to rectify the situation ( perhaps i associate it to been powerless… ). Find ur Centre.

          Reply
  4. coleen

    so glad it isnt just me I knew there was something not normal about the way I reacted to sounds and movements clocks ticking,chewing, snoring, crisp bags,even my poor husbands breathing irritates me to the point of red mist! The list of noises is endless! Didnt realise that the irritation of movements existed I thought it was me being hypersensitive!Seeing my hubby tap his foot through the corner of my eye again brings me to the point where I feel im going to explode with rage! This is steadily getting worse! I am now getting to the point where im frightened to go to bed because my hubby snores and fidgets! This is getting very concerning for me! When I tell people they laugh and think im a loon! just so glad im not! And these are recognised disorders!

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Don’t worry Coleen, you’re in good company! I hope that if we can discover more about these conditions we’ll be able to develop better coping mechanisms that we can all use.

      Reply
  5. Annadell

    Yep I have this. I get irrationally furious at people for many of their movements. The list is very long and some people have unique movements that drive me bonkers. All I can think of doing is smacking them and yelling at them, but I know I’m being crazy so I will contort myself any way I need to not to see them move.

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      I find that as well. Some people definitely seem to have movements unique to them which are triggers. The temptation is to scream “WHAT THE HELL ARE YOU DOING?”

      Reply
  6. Xan

    This is just great! So first I’ve just found out that a life long problem I’ve had with certain noise like sniffing and chewing is a mental disorder , now I find out I suffer from two mental disorders !! Wow! My misokinesia are: people flopping their hands, I get so nervous I want to kick their hand! People chewing gum, even though I have headphones on to block out the sound, if I can still see their mouth moving up and down It drives me crazy. People fiddling with their hands or bouncing their legs…. God it’s a nightmare. How do I handle it? Well thank god for the invention of the ipad! I play music plugged into my ears and keep my head down playing on games on my ipad, it helps so much. I feel like I’m going mad sometimes. I have become so withdrawn from people. But their is one thing I’m happy about, finding out their is a name/s for my condition and I’m not alone. In 35 years no one has understood up until now. It’s such a relief

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Hi Xan, I think you’re right, distraction seems to work best (headphones in and focus on a book/iPad etc). I’m hoping that as a community we’ll discover we have all some sort of previously undiscovered superpower that makes up for the misophonia/misokinesia.

      Reply
  7. Pat

    My daughter has this condition. I never knew there was a name for it. I just thought it was part of her anxiety/OCD disorder. I have noticed it’s worse when she is anxious. For about 4 or 5 years now she will tell me to stop if I am touching my fingers or picking at my nails or something similar. She also does not want anyone to talk to her when she is eating. I don’t know if that is part of it.

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Thanks for the comment Pat. I personally find it’s worse when I’m stressed or anxious as well, so it does sound like it might be part of her condition. I’ve found that knowing it’s ‘a thing’ is helpful in that it can help you to rationalise the feelings when you’re in the moment. I have an aversion to other people talking to me when they’re eating too (particularly people I’m very close to, such as my partner, mum, sister etc) and that’s totally misophonia related. It’s the licking lips/chewing/slight noises that people sometimes make when they’re talking in-between mouthfuls. It’s totally irrational of course – and it never reflects on the person – but it’s a thing unfortunately.

      Reply
      • Magi

        My sister just brought this condition to my attention. I had never heard of it. Both my sister and I have the same aversions, which sounds like we both suffer from Misophonia AND Misokinesia. I thought we were just miserable sods!
        My husband, bless his heart, makes coffee -lovely frothy coffee in the mornings and we sit in bed and chat. I want to scream when talks through a mouthful of foam; the sound of it!!! I say, stifling a yell “oh please, don’t do that, I can’t understand you” If someone calls me on the phone and I can hear they are eating something I want to scream – it makes me so bad tempered. Cinema noises, rustling, coughing, fidgeting. What is really awful is when children make a sudden racket when I am on the balcony – their sudden calling to each other actually hurts my ears if I am not prepared for the noise. I just want to shout “Shut up”. I hate being like this, there are so many triggers that set off a rage in me.
        I have almost pounced (literally) on a stranger cracking his knuckles on a train. I screamed “Oh NO, don’t do that!” He together with the other passengers thought I was a mad woman. It doesn’t really make it easier to know there is a name for this madness really, even worse to know there is no cure.

        Reply
      • Ashley

        Thank you- I needed to read this- I don’t feel like a crazy asshole anymore

        Reply
      • Chrissy

        Yes, sister, partner, daughter all those closest to me 🙁
        This has made my night!! I though I was odd, over sensitive, weird, irrational, COLD…. Finally 🙂 x

        Reply
  8. Vic

    I am so glad to hear that it’s a real brain disorder and that I am not crazy… It came first when I was 16/17 and it affected my relationship with some of my family member as they did not understand me. The thing is: when people knows that you can’t support some sound and/or movement they can use it (my sister used it a lot it was painful). So it’s better to keep it for us 🙁
    And the way to prevent that is to focus on something else, to listen some music or just to leave.
    For example when I am in my office and hear my boss next to me doing the same repetitive noise by touching her mac’s touch I just listen music.
    I am scare to see that it’s getting worse with the age, do you have any other tips to make our life easier ?
    Thanks a lot,
    Vic

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Hi Vic, thanks for the comment. I’ve been thinking about this and on the one hand it does feel like it’s getting worse with age, but then I think it could be related to lifestyle as well. I’ve noticed it definitely gets worse in stressful situations. For example at work, or in certain social situations which might not have arisen as frequently when we were younger.

      That’s a great tip about the headphones and one I use myself frequently. Other tips include… working in a quiet room for a few hours (meeting room for example) can really help. Just say you’re working on something that requires a lot of concentration. Working from home once a week really helps if you can.

      If I’m having a real panic I say I just need to go to the bathroom/toilet. That instantly works and doesn’t seem weird (unless you over use it!). Then I just take a few deep breaths and splash my face with cold water. If you’re already used the toilet trick recently, you could also go and get a drink of water or better still offer to make people some tea/coffee.

      Reply
      • Carina

        I can’t sit through a whole meal. I always “go to the bathroom” at least once or twice.
        It is worse if we’re eating at a closed space, where people are crammed, like in my parent’s house, where you feel trapped and unable to have an easy escape the threat to your sanity.

        Reply
        • Melissa W.

          Same for me with eating in close quarters with others. Most the time, I just say that I’m not hungry yet and eat after everyone else is done and gone away!

          Reply
  9. Kitkat

    My beautiful 3 year old son has this with ‘picking’, nails, sores etc… the sound and the action. I have suffered from these conditions since about 6 years old, for 20 years. I feel so guilty for passing it onto my son. I get so angry even when i look at people’s mouths. 🙁 I would consider shock therapy if it would cure me.

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Thanks KitKat. Well the good thing is he has a mother than completely understands what he’s going through and that will really help him! When he realises that there’s absolutely nothing wrong with him and that he’s not a ‘freak’ for feeling this way, hopefully he’ll find coping mechanisms that work for him.

      Reply
  10. rabbitbloom

    My 9 yo son has Misophonia and Misokinesia. He has a name for the movements that trigger him – “animations.” If he sees someone pointing, for example, he will scream, “Don’t make that animation!” He is not able to focus on anything else until the triggering “animation” (and/or sound) stops. He tells me he is not able to look away or move away. Some “animations” that trigger him are : scratching a nose, movement of hand to mouth while eating, walking, running, bicycling, jumping, and hand and pencil writing on paper. He is also autistic and has OCD and Sensory Processing Disorder. Up until a few days ago, I though his reaction to sound and movement was a combination of SPD and OCD.

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Hi Rabbit bloom. Thanks for your comment. That’s really interesting. I freak out with pointing as well but I’d never made the connection with that and misokinesia before. It’s incredibly interesting what you say about his autism, OCD and SPD. There still aren’t any conclusive studies which pinpoint exactly what causes misokinesia but I suspect OCD is a part of it (I have mild OCD). I know OCD and autism are often mentioned in relation to both misophonia and misokinesia.

      Reply
  11. Mix

    I most certainly get this! My Mum and other members of the family constantly move some part of their body – jiggling knee, wagging foot… I think it’s an anxious energy outlet. And my husband constantly pulls on / fiddles with his beard (aaargh!).
    The funny thing is, I feel easier about asking (close) people to stop the movements than I do about the noises, as I can be a bit more ‘jokey’ in my approach. I dread noise makers getting more personally offended, and almost all times I will remove myself from the situation where possible rather than risk insulting them. Plus it’s my problem, so I like to feel like I have some tactics for dealing with it – going to the bathroom, making a cuppa etc.
    I had a big talk with my Mum, and she is awesome at understanding that it’s not personal – and knows just how badly I feel, and how tortuous it is to live with. Husband is great too, and very supportive if I’m overwhelmed, but I do on occasion get an eye-roll or miniature huff if he’s the cause. I can deal with that. 😉

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Hi Mix, thanks for your comment. I know what you mean, I find it much easier to stop people making the movements than sounds. Especially if it’s someone you’re really close to because you can just take their hand and as you say, make a joke out of it. I sometimes pick my girlfriend up or give her a kiss. So glad you have a supportive family and husband, that is half the battle. BEARD STROKING IS MY NEMESIS.

      Reply
      • Rhonda

        I had my husband trim his beard, it’s perfect because he doesn’t constantly stroke it now. He also was causing facial blemishes because of the oils in his hands. So many beards out there now in 2018. Sorry it’s a big trigger for you.

        Reply
  12. Michelle spencer

    I’m a 45 year old woman who though I was completely irrational,I suffer from both complaints and have for as long as I can remember. I live with my partner of 7 years and I adore him but he foot taps,scratches,picks etc etc. If he decides he wants to eat nuts I have to completely leave the vicinity and have even been known to bury my head in pillows,blankets to drowned all noise.I can’t sit on the couch with him because of his constant movement.I also despise repetitive sound it leaves me feeling actually murderous even though I know I’m being hypersensitive

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Thanks for your comment Michelle. I recommend buying your partner giant mittens and 4 inch thick woollen socks that can’t be removed without a screwdriver. If that’s impractical (and I can’t think why it would be) then I hope that at least knowing that you’re not irrational or bonkers goes some way to helping you cope with your misokinesia/misophonia triggers

      Reply
  13. Donna

    I cannot believe reading this I am actually not a fussy impatient freak. At almost 47 years of age and not understanding why I have such violent tendancies over what I deemed as rediculous reasons. After all why would I get angry and feel violent over noises and certain movements. After reading the page and peoples comments I have sat here almost at the point of tears knowing I am not the only one. Thank you xx

    Reply
    • wobble21@tiscali.co.uk

      Donna, I was exactly the same. I have always wondered why these things bother me – yet they bother no one else! Although I would not wish this curse on anyone I am pleased to have found this group with people who understand. Its no fun being a hermit!

      Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Thanks for the comment Donna! The MASSIVE relief of discovering that misophonia/misokinesia is actually a neurological condition (and that we’re not completely irrational monsters) has really helped me. That’s exactly why I set the site up, so that we can help each other to through this, work out the best coping mechanisms and educate others

      Reply
    • Magi

      Oh Donna – this is just how I feel. In fact I thought everyone had these, what seemed like phobias, but just didn’t show them. Does it help in the long run to know what it’s called? I have also used the “drown out” method – but I’d like to tackle the cause somehow.

      Reply
  14. Emily

    I noticed I had synaesthesia first at about 18, I see all words in colours, I didn’t know it had a name, I just thought everyone did and then it’s only when my Mum heard a documentary about misophonia/misokinesia that she realised I had that too. The worst movement is when someone jiggles their foot – if I could see that during exams it was awful and soundwise it’s when someone slurps tea, I get so angry and feel like I have to get out of the room, I just thought I was really intolerant, I’m so glad it isn’t just me!

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Hi Emily, that’s really interesting. Some academics (including a friend of mine who’s doing a PHD in synaesthesia at the moment) think that there may be links between synaesthesia and misophonia. They’re all sensory conditions so it wouldn’t surprise me if they were linked.

      Reply
      • Cybil

        I am curious if these are also related to OCD?

        Reply
        • Allergic to Sound

          Hi Cybil. Very interesting (and somewhat controversial) question! I personally believe that misophonia/misokinesia is a sensory disorder, however it’s not uncommon for people to have both miso and OCD.

          Reply
          • Em Ell

            I’ve been diagnosed with OCD and I can tell you they’re almost certainly linked. Part of OCD is the inability to filter what a standard human would consider extraneous. Is someone endlessly picking at their eye extraneous? Pretty much always. Does it make me want to destroy the planet when someone does it? Sure does.

          • Allergic to Sound

            Hi Em, many people with misophonia do also have OCD but just to clarify, it’s not necessarily the case the two are inextricably linked (and that to have one you must have the other). It seems to be that they often cohabit. It will be interesting to see what more neurological research here brings up!

    • Margaret

      I started hating eating sounds aged 8. I am 55 now. I had a very happy period of life when work and marriage were going well, children were little, all was ok and my triggers were mainly under control, I didn’t get overly upset about them. Since the last 8 years I have had more stress from family life and the triggers are much worse. It has got to the stage where I sleep in my separate room in a single bed with a fan on to drown out the background noise of my family, I cannot stand the sound of my husband eating, drinking, shaving, bathing, cleaning his teeth, peeing drives me to rage, all these things did not used to be like this when I was younger and not stressed and happy with life. I have a very loud kitchen fan which I put on for meal times, I wear ear plugs on public transport, I often stand by the doors of trains with my ear plugs in looking out the window so I don’t have to see or hear everyone eating or picking their skin, head, hair, nose, beard etc.
      My daughter has exactly the same as me which is really sad. My son does not. My husband does not understand it at all. He makes no effort at all to understand me or our daughter. Sad. If I could I would leave and go live on an island with my dog and my flute. But I have to be here for our children. The marriage is sad. I can’t stand the sounds and movements that he makes, stirring his tea, dragging his feet, picking his teeth, disgusting, all these things disgust me. Not just from him but from anyone who does it but it is so sad that it appears so vile from him. Maybe cos he doesn’t try to help me with it.
      My daughter and I make every effort to minimise triggers for each other. I would walk to the moon and back to find a cure. It is a very physical response to sound and movement. It is not under my control. I don’t ask for sympathy I just want to be understood.

      Reply
  15. Mix

    I believe I have some synaesthesia too. I get colours with some words etc, and I get shapes come with both sounds and smells. Sometimes when I’m trying to describe a smell (especially with perfumes), I actually end up describing its shape.

    Reply
  16. Donna

    My son suffers from misophonia and misokinesia. He reminds me a lot about certain movements when we’re together. In the past I’ve felt like I can’t move when I’m around him, but I’ve gotten use to it. I am not bothered by movements, only by sounds.

    Reply
  17. Michelle

    I am in the same boat. Along with the sound triggers I also am bothered to rage about fidgeting, leg shaking, beard rubbing, and pretty much any and all repetitive motions in my peripheral vision. My mother is a leg shaker and fidgeter, my husband plays with his beard and rubs his face and arms a lot. My daughter fidget and bites her nails. The odd part is these things only bother me if they are next to me in a car or the couch. If I am looking right at them or across from them it’s not so bad. But if I catch it from the corners of my eyes. RAGE. I can’t even think straight. I love my mom but she is often the perfect storm of tapping, humming, leg shaking and fidgeting and I have snapped angrily at her many times and have had to apologize then attempt to explain my feelings. Ugh. Sorry to vent but I definitely know how you feel.

    Reply
    • Cybil

      My daughter fidgets too and sometimes my husband strokes his eyebrows… send me into a RAGE too. I hate that it makes me feel this way. I wish there was a better way to deal with this other than to “just deal with it. I wonder if this is also linked to OCD?

      Reply
  18. Sue-anne

    I’m in my 50’s and now there is finally a word or words that describe this bloody annoying problem I’ve had since childhood. I’ts terribly embarrassing when you’re caught out putting earplugs in at the movies seated next to your Mother, (who’s simply breathing), having to plead with your Husband to stop fidgeting his feet while relaxing in the lounge, glaring at people on transport who are swinging there legs in a seat or God forbid breathing with a whistling schnoz. Chewing gum sends me potty, scraping teeth on forks sends shivers of hatred through my core and swallowing, slurping, open mouthed chewing, I could go on; well I have always thought I’m super sensitive to sound or nutty, until now.
    Happily my hubby still loves me and puts up with it, and I have mellowed, or managed it somewhat, but I get the concern of other sufferers and their friends and family cause it’s such an uncommon affliction and not dissimilar to depression/anxiety, as It’s not accepted as a ‘real’ problem by many.
    So thanks for your blog, It was fascinating reading everyone’s comments and good luck to all.

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Hi Sue-anne, thanks for your comment. There’s some really interesting research being done into misophonia at the moment, so hopefully this will shed light on this little known condition and misokinesa which seems to be strongly related

      Reply
    • Nona Mouse

      Many years ago I dated a guy who HATED it when I scraped my teeth on a fork and would angrily tell me to use my lips instead. And I would angrily tell him to shove it, because I have sensory processing disorder (unknown at that time) and am revolted by scraping food off a fork with my lips, especially if the food is the LEAST bit oily or greasy (one of my worst sensory triggers!) So much so that I actually curl my lips as far away from the food as I can get them when I am putting it in my mouth! LOL
      What with the Clash of the Neurological disorders, mealtimes with that ex could get interesting.

      Reply
  19. Teresa

    The answer is YES. I have what I would consider a very severe case of both Misophonia and Misokinesia. I can’t be sure which came first because I feel like I’ve been affected my whole life. My earliest memory is my brothers eating cereal and how I would hate the sound and yell at them to chew with their mouths closed. They always swore they were, and after being diagnosed with Misophonia 4 years ago, I finally realized it was the sound of their chewing with their mouths closed and the movement of their jaws that would infuriate me. I’m 49 and I was probably 6 or 7 at that time. Over the years, it has gotten progressively worse. People who tap their legs, hair twirling, even people staring at their phones and scrolling through their phone which is a repetitive type movement will make it impossible for me to concentrate on anything other than screaming at them in my head to stop. I also hate people getting too close to me and feeling their body heat on me. I take the train everyday and will literally scrunch myself into the tiniest corner of a seat so that the person next to me doesn’t touch me. And if they’re chewing gum and I can see their mouth moving, I’ll pull my hair across my cheek just to cover up my peripheral vision. Add in any type of movement and I’m out of there. I change seats more often than not and sometimes it’s awkward because I’ll have to stand in a crowded train and people thinks it weird that I’m giving up a seat to stand. Which it is but I’m afraid of the one day that I can’t control my impulse to punch their faces off. I have the sound maskers that were prescribed by an audiologist to help drown out the miso triggers I hate but they do nothing for the Misokinesia visual triggers that are just as bad.

    I hope your friend’s research is successful in whatever small way and one day there’s some hope for all of us suffering from these very odd and horrendous disorders.

    Reply
    • Cybil

      This sounds EXACTLY like me. I too cannot stand people touching me. When I took the bus/train, things would drive me crazy. Someone reading a book and flipping pages or someone shaking a newspaper… omg, I can’t even tell you the trauma that would occur in my brain. I wanted to scream in their faces to stop. It was just all too much. I’m happy I am not the only one. The worst was watching/hearing nail clippers in public. The noise and visual were enough to nearly send me to the loony bin LOL

      Reply
      • Maggie

        I also hate nail clicking their nails or looking like they are about to. My worst trigger is people clearing their throats constantly, but the above are just two of many! This is a curse that is very difficult to live with.

        Reply
    • Magi

      Oh Teresa…I just laughed out loud reading this. Maybe that is it… we should try to laugh at it. I could sooooo empathize with you. People who sit so close on the train that you can feel their heat. Or they decide to munch on a crusty bread roll, half in the paper bag it came in,the smell of chicken or burger also fills the compartment (as a vegetarian it is particularly nauseating)- they sit there totally oblivious of the sound they are making; flicking through a magazine with tight little flips – licking their fingers between pages. Yes, the feeling of “wanting to punch their faces off” comes to mind.
      I’m laughing again….it does me good. Thanks for that. 🙂

      Reply
    • Melissa

      I have both misophonia and misokinesia, but I thought I was the only one who get annoyed by people scrolling through their phones, and that is so frustrating because everywhere you go there’s people scrolling through their phones. I wish there was a cure for this!

      Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Thanks for the comment Teresa. Lots of interesting research underway at the moment, so fingers crossed. Using your hair to cover your eyes when you’re in a tricky situation – that’s a brilliant idea! I just need to grow some long hair now!

      Reply
      • Maggie

        Hi, could you tell me where the research is being done, can sufferers volunteer to be guinea pigs? I live in the north of England.

        Reply
        • Allergic to Sound

          Hi Maggie, yes potentially. I’ve been in touch with a neuroscientist (Dr Kumar) who’s a research fellow at Newcastle University and UCL. He may be conducting more studies into misophonia this year. He’s going to get in touch with me if he needs more volunteers, so if put your name on my email list (below or in the sidebar) and I’ll keep you updated.

          Reply
          • Maggie

            Hi, thanks for your quick reply. Newcastle would be good for me. Can I have the link to add my name please. I’m not computer savvy so don’t know what a sidebar is. It’s heart warming to know research mistaking place. Thank you!

        • Allergic to Sound

          Hi Maggie. So at the bottom of this article (above these comments) is a dark box which says: “Enjoy this article? Get the FREE Misophonia Newsletter”. Just put your name and email in there. You can also see a similar box on the top right hand side of this article (that’s what I meant by sidebar). Either should work. Let me know if that helps!

          Reply
      • Moksha

        One trick I use for my misokinesia is wearing a cap with a large peak. Anything from a flat cap to a baseball cap works very well for this! If there is someone on one side of me who is triggering me (especially the sight of people chewing gum — it makes me want to murder them!), I will just put my cap askew to hide them from my peripheral vision. One advantage to doing it this way instead of hiding my head in my hand is that, instead of thinking that I’m neurotic, they’ll just think that I’m trying to be some “cool” hip-hop guy or something. I guess I’ll take people thinking I’m a bit immature over people staring at me while I feel vulnerable. Mind you, this still doesn’t solve the problem of what to do if they’re right in front of me — I find that nothing short of looking straight down at the floor can address this.

        Reply
        • Melissa

          I understand your pain! If I’m in a waiting room somewhere or wherever possible, I actually just close my eyes and pretend I’m tired..lol. I know it looks silly, but I just think it’s better then to continue to watch whatever is driving me to the feeling of flipping out. It’s harder with sounds though. I have actually got up and left appointments before because of someone chewing there gum or eating chips. I have walked out in the middle of conversations before to, just to get away. I feel that if I don’t leave the situation, I will punch someone. RRRR.. I wish people would just stop eating like cows and become a little less immobile..lol. Well, really it’s not funny.. It will drive people like us MAD!

          Reply
          • Sofía

            I do also feel so afraid and fourious when I’m in a similar situation.But I have to say that what makes me more upset is the sound..I can’t stand with it.I feel much worse when is my family(for instance:my mum) who is the one who makes those horrible sounds while she is eating or even when she is talking…I can’t stand the sound of some consonants she use..like “t’s”…duh that’s so annoying.It makes me wanna leave the place asap:( I feel completely scare,agressive,and..it’s uncomfortable.I hate it.in fact just the thought of that makes me mad lol.

          • Melissa W.

            Yes.. Misokinesia is movement and misophonia is sound.. I have both also. I understand being angry and feeling rage most the day, as my boyfriend makes moans, groans, huffs and puffs every time he moves and also eats with his mouth open. The only thing I figured out that helps a little at this point is to leave the room, as you mentioned, and I also wear earplugs ALL day long. It’s getting hard though because my ears are raw inside and get pussy and bleed from wearing the earplugs so much. But.. I just keep pushing them little suckers in every morning when I wake up, till I go to bed. So, I would have to say that movement that bothers me is a bit easier to get away from, from raising you hand up in front of your face to block it, or just closing your eyes. The sound is just horrid to deal with. I feel like I’m going crazy! I just wish it would stop already! I wish I had answers, as the list of triggers seems to keep getting longer and longer as I get older. This is an awful way to live, but get a bit of comfort knowing that it is actually classified as an illness now and hopefully they can find some treatments. Best wishes to everyone…

  20. Tabby

    Yes yes yes! I was led to this page by the bonus question on the misophonia page….I clearly suffer from both, and have done since I was small. My first trigger for misophonia was my mother clicking her tongue…aargh! And then she had the temerity to trigger my misokinesia with this utterly maddening gesture of slowly running her tongue along her bottom lip back and forth…..I feel half demented thinking about it even now.

    The synaesthesia is an interesting slant and may well hold the key. I know I sit somewhere on that scale too…music is shapes, days of the week are colours (yellow Tuesday, anyone?!), memories have flavours, and oh, just everything is a wonderful mish-mash of music, shapes, colours, flavours, sounds, etc and I wouldn’t change that for anything!!

    Misophonia and misokinesia are, on the other hand, no fun at all. Slurping, sniffing, sneezing, burping (omg, the BURPING!), dogs barking, scratching, constant chatter, crunching (crisps particularly), traffic noise, my kids currently playing with their party hooters, whistling, my ex’s voice (he’s German, and has a grating accent, not his fault, I’m being unreasonable, I know, but wow, I HATE IT), snoring, clicking pens, light switch noises, nail biting, tapping, leg swinging, fidgeting, lip licking, people who smack their hands together to emphasise points and do a smack for every…damn….word…gesticulations, hair chewing, excessive blinking, slouching so far down in a chair the person is almost on the floor, the list goes on.

    JUST SIT STILL AND BE QUIET!!!! It’s hideous and the rage that comes with it is unsettling as I’m normally a peaceful person. My family don’t get it, they just think I’m irritable and a “bad tempered bitch” (charming).

    I too hope your friend has success with the research, and I’m happy to be in touch and offer help if needs be.

    Good luck to everyone, my fellow sufferers, and although I wouldn’t wish it on anyone else, it’s reassuring to not be alone.

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Thanks for your comment Tabby! That’s really interesting and many thanks for your offer regarding the research. I’m jealous of all those colours and flavours you’re getting through the synaesthesia, sounds awesome!

      Reply
  21. Cybil

    I agree with all of your comments. So many things bother me and only just today realized it has a name. I find my misophonia gets worse every year. Now to know the movement issue has a name too is completely wild.
    I remember one of the first times I noticed it. A man was sitting across from me on the subway and he had a tic. It was something he couldn’t stop, but I began to feel anxious and as time went on, I started to feel enraged. My emotions were running so high and my anxiety level was out of control, so I had to move subway cars. I thought I was going crazy!
    I sit in an office, and people take phone calls on speaker or leave their cell noises “on”… including for the phone ringing and receiving texts, but the worst is texting. The sound of the click clicking can send me running out the door. The girls that sits next to me eats rice cakes in the early morning and for her afternoon snack. Just about enough to drive me nuts!! I put in ear phones a lot because it is so disturbing some days. So glad I am not alone in this

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Hi Cybil, thanks for the comment. Sorry to hear yours is getting worse. I’m guessing everyone will have different experiences, but in my case the severity of the misophonia is also linked to my current environment and stress levels. Obviously the two are often interconnected. I’m lucky in that my current working environment (by most people’s standards) is incredibly quiet but a few years ago I was in a busy office with lots of noise and it felt like every day was a battle. If you’re able to put on ambient noise, or listen to music through earphones when you’re at work – or even better find ways to work in a quiet room (or from home) from time to time it can help immensely.

      Reply
  22. Mandi

    Just reading both articles has made me sick(nervous sick)to my stomach. Besides instant anger that is my most common respond to any body function noise and any repetitive movement. This works poorly in my favor with two little girls and attending college courses in which every child there makes excessive movements and eats chips out of a crinkly bag(now I am rambling). My husband says I need medication (sometimes playfully and I’m afraid other times not). I try to cover my anger, sometimes I sit and think of how to properly word to someone that if they do not cease making the noise they are making I might scream. Try being locked in a moving vehicle while your daughters friend sucks on a sucker so loud you have to do everything your power to A. Continue driving well
    B. Not do her bodily harm(my children would never suck on a sucker loud, they no me well)
    C. Figure out the fastest and most appropriate way to get her to stop ASAP
    D. Recover quickly enough to not be the “crazy” lady
    Luckily I hide well and kids love me, but it eats me up on the inside and is taken out mostly on my family. Secretly I ca not stand even watching TV with them because they move around so much. I personally like to sit very still. However I love them more than anything, so I snuggle up and act unaffected and just focus on the fact I can sit quietly after they go to bed. I feel like I sound like a terrible parent, but I no I am not. In fact I may be the best because I endure internal pain and keep it hidden(well a lot of times). They are just very well mannered at the table. No slurping, no chewing loud and chips….well I try! 🙂 :/

    Reply
  23. Suzanne

    My teenage daughter is suffering from many of the symptoms both misophonia and misokinesia. How does one go about getting an official diagnosis? Does it have to be done by a clinical psychologist? If so, any recommendations/

    Reply
  24. Alicia

    I’m 13, and I recently discovered what Misophonia was after I was sent into a fit of panic and anger when listening to a hairdryer sound in a YouTube video even though I had never reacted that badly to a sound before. I usually just end up whimpering and trying to tune the triggers out.
    I was glad that I wasn’t crazy and that I actually had something to explain what I was feeling.
    I have a question about Misokinesia. Does it apply to just specific movements, or could it be any sudden movement? Because sudden movement triggers me, as well.

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Hi Alicia, I can only speak from my own experiences, but yes, in my case the misokinesia applies to sudden movements as well. It seems to be any movement (from another person) that I wasn’t expecting, as well as the repetitive movements I talk about above.

      Reply
  25. Megan P.

    OMG Finally I know the name of this problem I have… It makes me as irritated as misophonia and I thought it was OCD or something and it didn’t help that I was having depression at that time also

    Reply
  26. Cara

    I have learned that with mine, it does not tend to have a huge affect unless I am tired or irritated already. It is almost like a side effect of my misophonia. Things like my brother flicking his foot is hard to deal with because, as well as the movement, I can feel the vibrations. It is somewhat similar to misophonia except I can feel it rather than hear it. Other things like people typing on keyboards at school, my mum rubbing her thumb in a circle on her mug etc. are all problems too.

    Reply
  27. Erin

    I about lost my mind when I read the ring thing! My fiance does that all the time, where I will catch him spinning his ring around his finger, and just thinking about it makes my upper back and neck CLENCH. The way mine typically manifests as just fidgety hand stuff, however mine also kind of triggers a panic when someone is repeatedly touching me. Like when my fiance is absentmindedly rubbing parts of my skin with his fingers, typically on my arms or hands, I become unhinged. I don’t have a misophonia problem, really. The only trigger that I have that is coming to mind is when things like nails or metal scrap against glass or ceramic. It literally makes my teeth hurt and my eyes water.

    Reply
  28. mohammad

    I have this problem too . I searched about misokinesia in google but i didn’t found related webpages . I wonder how you found this idiom “misokinesia “

    Reply
    • Lila

      I can completely relate to you and I’m so glad I was finally able to put a name to it! I thought I was the only crazy person that got on a verge of a panic attack and on edge everytime my husband sits next to me and twirls his hair for hours on end (I’m getting palpitations as I type) or I’m at the Dr’s office and someone starts to fidget or bounce their foot. I have to look away or sit somewhere else, if I don’t want to start shaking from anxiety and yes, at times get in a bad mood because of it as well.
      Hope there is a cure, because it’s very hard to live with someone who does not think they have a problem 🙁

      Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Hi Mohammed, so the term misokinesia is used by Arjan Schröder in the report: ‘Misophonia: Diagnostic Criteria for a New Psychiatric Disorder’. I’ll see if I can link to it from the research page.

      Reply
  29. Maggie

    Thank you, I think I have worked it out, hopefully!!

    Reply
  30. Ale

    Hey! This is the first time I have come across it having a name. I have been trying to research it for a while, but I guess my searches were defined enough. I have had misophonia for as far back as I can remember, but the motions have lately gotten worse. I cant stand to see people play with their hair, shake their foot, play with their hands. It gives me so much negative emotion, and i cant escape it.

    Reply
  31. Nadhiya Mali

    Hi from India. I suffer from both misophonia and misokinesia. Sound triggers include ppl chewing, snoring, scraping, spoon on plate, loud glaring music, mild television sound from the next room and may be a lot more. Misokinesia is mild though. I have a problem with people shaking their legs uncontrollably

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Welcome Nadhiya! It does seem that for many of us, the effect of auditory triggers (misophonia) is significantly more intense than visual triggers.

      Reply
  32. AJ Humpage

    I suffer from both. I’ve had misophonia since childhood, but over the last four years it has been exacerbated at work because everyone eats at their desks constantly (it’s an open office, so lip-smacking, slurping, munching and crunching of crisps (potato chips) and especially apples – God I have to fight the urge to become violent if someone eats an apple – the scraping of yoghurt pots, clinking of spoons against breakfast bowls, the rattling of packets or plastic bags, the sucking ‘sss’ sound when you sip from a sippy water bottle…and now I have developed misokinesia.

    My colleague next to me drinks his coffee by sipping, putting it down, sipping, putting it down then throwing his head back and glugging it until it’s gone, finished off with a loud “ahhhhh”. I really want to smash his face in. That sounds terrible, but I really do feel enraged. I get annoyed when people eat the last few crumbs from their crisp packets and tip the packet back like it was a cup. Apart from being uncouth, it really aggravates me. I have to look away, pretend to do something else or go make a drink. I wear earplugs during lunch break to avoid the sounds of eating, or I go and take a very long loo break!

    I also commute and it’s a battle everyday, so now I listen to music and have two mp3 players at hand. I just have to mitigate it’s power as best as I can each day and not let it get to me (I sit on my hands a lot…)

    Reply
  33. Michelle

    I can’t tell you how relieved I am to finally discover that I am not alone and that this is a real disorder that I have! I’ve also had misophonia since childhood, which increased during my teenage years, at which time I also developed misokinesia. It started with my parents’ loud kissing and eating noises when I was young and then when I was a teenager my mom started clearing her throat all the time. We went on a road trip once when I was in my twenties and we almost killed each other, I just couldn’t stand it! I think for me the misokinesia bothers me even more than noises. As a teenager it started with my father constantly rubbing his feet together in a rythmic, repetitive motion. Sometimes I could hear his socks rubbing together too. Just thinking about it makes me clench up and want to punch something. I have to do something to block the visual so I can’t see it or leave the room, especially if I can also hear it. For the longest time, it only bothered me when my parents did these things and once I moved out of the house after college it was a great relief. Over the last few years though it has really started bothering me again when my husband rubs his feet together. It has actually caused problems in our relationship because when I told him how much it bothered me he thought I was crazy. Every time he does it I get mad and then he gets mad. He has finally for the most part stopped rubbing his feet together but now he twiddles his thumbs constantly. It makes me crazy but I’m afraid to tell him. I finally got him to stop moving his feet! 🙂 I’m afraid if I tell him to stop twiddling his thumbs he is just going to hate me. If I’m sitting on the couch next to him I just grab his hand like I want to hold hands. I have thought so many times about how I can try to cure myself of this. Like if I just force myself to watch my dad rub his feet together instead of leaving the room. I just can’t make myself do it, though, it makes me feel like peeling off my skin! I am very interested to hear about any continued research in this area! Thanks so much for posting this article. I at least have some peace in knowing I’m not alone!

    Reply
    • Emily

      I feel the same way about my mom rubbing her feet together, and the socks making noises! I commented below if you’re interested in knowing what else i go through. Also, it mostly bothers me when ny parents do these things. With my friends I dont notice it too much unless im in class and hear/seee someone out of the corner of my eye. I totally understand!!

      Reply
  34. Anagha

    I have misophonia. It is incredibly intense where I get violent thoughts towards the person making those sounds. But misokinesia I’ve experienced only twice in my life (that I can think of). Once when I was 13 years old, there was this girl in my art class who was extremely gentle and slow. To the point where she would take about four whole seconds just to put her brush down. I wanted to snap at her so bad, I was so red with rage that I still remember that incident. I couldn’t focus on my own painting and I kept picking out every annoying movement of hers. Another instance was when I was 16 and this teacher kept scraping at her fingernails.She did this in every lecture and for the ENTIRE hour. It made me so angry that I could never pay attention to her teaching and I had to eventually drop her class.

    Reply
  35. Emily

    I am so glad to find out I’m not alone in this! I have both of these disorders, for sure. My mom will be sitting on the couch and we’re watching a movie, and she always rubs her feet together. It drives me crazy! The same thing happens with watching/hearing people eat, expecially my dad. It partially ruined our relationshio because I have yelled at him so many times for chewing too loud. I cant stand watching my mom rub her hands together, watching people bite their nails, tap the desk with their fingers, and so many more. For some reason, doing these actions or making these sounds myself is no problem for me at all, so I’ve learned to eat louder to tune them out, and to tap mt own finger on the desk. If its a movement, i try to distract myself or put myself at an angle where I can’t see the person anymore. Thank you for posting this, i am so happy to know about it!

    Reply
  36. Ruby

    This is literally me,
    However, it’s only with certain people such as my mum, my dad, my siblings and my boyfriend ( seriously no one else)
    Every time I sit at the dinner table and eat my food, not only do I absolutely hate the sound of everyone eating I also can’t stand the look of someone eating like moving there jaw back and forth just munching in their food; it literally makes me just want to jump off my seats me scream!!
    My sisters constantly crack their knuckles and I seriously can’t stand it I feel like the whole world is blocked out and all I can see and hear is them cracking their knuckles and fidgeting with their fingers.
    I also hate when my mum sits in the car and flicks her nails (because they’re too long) and she just flicks them and I can’t stand it seriously.
    Once, when my boyfriend and I were in the movies he kept biting his nails and crunching On his popcorn, I literally sat their and just couldn’t turn my head away from looking at him biting his nails yet I didn’t want to look, it made me just so annoyed and felt like I was about to cry and I just wanted to run out of the cinema.
    Every time these things happen or occur I just feel like I’m having an anxiety attack and I can’t control it because I don’t want to sound rude.
    Ugh someone please help me because I literally can’t stand it and I’m writing these while my mum is crunching on her potatoe chips while talking to my grandma ???

    Reply
    • Melissa

      Hi, my name is Melissa. Finding this website and seeing people talking about it is such a relieve cause I thought I was the only one with those problems. I also can’t stand the look of someone eating, it’s so disturbing. I wish I didn’t have misophonia and misokinesia at all. Because of those things, I tend to distance myself from others. Let’s hope someone find a definitive cure! Sorry for any mispellings, I’m from Brazil =)

      Reply
  37. Ruby

    I have been avoiding sounds and repetitive movements since I was about 8 or 9. My brothers aren’t allowed to play with their hair, fingers or shake their feet when I am in the room. Because we have all grown up together I will hit the part of their body that’s annoying me and they will stop. They are so so good about it but I didn’t realise until reading this article how strange this was. My mum arranges the dinner table so I am not beside anyone that eating annoys me. I can stare at any of my family members and they will stop whatever they are doing because they know it upsets me. I cannot share a bedroom with anyone because of the sound of breathing. Sitting exams in high school I would take in as much stationary as possible so i could shield out the sight of legs shaking and would always have earplugs with me! Has anyone done any treatment they found has worked? I have been suggested over exposure but i am scared to try.

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Hi Melissa, there is some amazing research on this taking place at the moment, so watch this space. In the meantime I’ll be posting coping mechanisms here on the site. Please please please don’t try exposure ‘therapy’. There is zero scientific evidence that it works and none of the leading researchers, psychologists or neurologists endorse it in any way shape or form. The only people who claim it works are the people who are making money from it. It could actually be damaging.

      Reply
    • Melissa

      You are so so lucky that your family are supportive. My family simply assume that I have some kind of depression. They don’t get it at all, in fact they’re always doing irritating sounds just so they can annoy me. It sucks. Be grateful that your family understands you 🙂

      Reply
  38. Girl 16

    Hello! So i am pretty sure i have misophonia, it started When I was 6. But What is really interresting is that i react s little bit to this too. For example , I CANT stand looking at my sister bescuse she blinks so much! Or people picking their feet og hair. I Also react When i see people doing my trigger sounds Even without hearing them Thanks!

    Reply
  39. Rebecca

    I remember as a young teen eating my breakfast while covering my ears and shielding my eyes so as not to be bothered by other family members who were making noises or repetitive movements with their hands and mouths. And ever since then I’ve learned all the coping mechanisms stated in various comments. Just today my husband’s pen clicking made me nearly go bonkers!

    This post…thank you for it. I’m glad there’s a name for both of these and now I am going to read more about both. And have my husband read them so he can understand why I get so irritated by certain fidgeting and sounds.

    Reply
  40. Sandra de Boer

    English is not my native language, so I apologize in advance for any grammar mistakes or anything else.

    I have misophonia and misokinesia. I found out that what I felt by sertain noises and movents was called misophonia/misokinesia when I told my therapist about how easily I get annoyed or frustrated by those things. She told me what it was, and I directly reconised it. (this was this year!) I think I have it for a while. When I was in elementary school, I think, I couldn’t stand the sight of the movement of somebody’s legs. I didn’t think much about it, because I didn’t have a strong feeling against it. But in the second year of high school, I started to get very annoyed and frustrated with the sounds my father made while eating, and the movements a classmate made with her legs. I didn’t think much about it either back then. But last year (my third year of high school), I began to feel angry and began to think very agressive if I saw her moving her legs like that. The things my father did(still do), like touching his face, biting his nails, chewing and making some weird faces while he’s concentrated made me also very angry and frustrated. This school year, it all got worse, I went down a level (from vwo to havo(I don’t know what this is called in english or how schools work in America/England/Austrelia) and those people do a lot more things that annoy me. All girls sweep with their legs, all boys shake their legs(I don’t know how to explain it), most people bite their nails, or they clean them, chew chewing gum, etc. I get very agressive thougts and want to go away if somebody does anything that annoys me. I also get very sad because I can’t go anywere without feeling annoyed.
    First my father got annoyed and mad, because he thougt that I got annoyed by him, not the movements or noices he made. But now, he tries his best to understand me, and tries to avoid making noices while we eat.
    My sister is a different story. She has anorexia and it’s difficult to handel with it. She feels the need to do everything she can to avoid making me annoyed, and it gives her stress. I don’t want her to do this, because she can’t do anything about it, but it is in her nature to try. She feels the same way as my family does about her having anorexia. We want to take it away from her, but we can’t. She has this feeling too with me.
    Anyway does your country have a treatment for this? If so, how do they do it? My country has it only in one place, far away from me.

    Reply
  41. M

    I have misophonia, I can’t stand someone else eating, chewing, crunching, drinking, tapping, whistling, scratching, etc. For some reason it’s a loooot worse when someone close to me does it. Not physically close, but like my family members or my best friends. I just read this article and learned there was a name for it, but I’ve noticed I’ve had this problem for a while. I get so angry about people picking their fingernails, scratching their head slowly, picking their face, tapping their hands. I try to just cover it up or not look and try to forget about it but my brain continues to focus on it and it’s terrible. It’s so hard to explain to people because it sounds ridiculous but it’s a real problem and it sucks.

    Reply
    • Lauren Bell

      I can relate to this. My brother and mom always did things that set me off far more than others! My mom would talk with her hands, eat popcorn (far too loudly), fidget her feet, scratch her arms. All the sounds would drive me absolutely crazy and I’d lash out asking her to stop.

      Reply
  42. Löwe

    Does anyone else become nauseated when people bounce/shake their leg/foot? My boyfriend seems to do it more and more lately, and I can hardly sit near him, it makes me feel so sick to feel or watch. Any tips?

    Reply
    • Melissa

      Hi, you can try blocking it out with your hand or your hair 🙂 or you can talk to him and explain him that, maybe he’ll understand.

      Reply
  43. Baileya

    I am so glad that I found this. I have thought and have been told that I was crazy or I was just being sensitive. I took your test and answered a for everything honestly. Several noises and movements drive me insane. I literally feel like pulling out all my hair and screaming and crying. I feel like I’m dying. I first noticed stuff bothered me when I was in the early years of elementary school. My brother was learning the drums so to practice, he would tap his fingers and his feet everywhere he went. I would cry and have fits and my mom and dad would get so angry at me for it. I couldn’t block it out there was always something there that wouldn’t go away. It progressively got worse. I can recall times where I would bang my head against the wall at night if I heard noises through the wall. It has gotten so bad that I always have to have head phones with me just in case I need to bock out something. I can’t Handel being in a room with people. All they have to do is shake their leg or whistle a little tune for me to loose it. I hate myself so much for it and its just getting worse. I try and tell my mom and dad about it but my dad says that I’m just tell in myself I have a problem and if I just ignored it it would go away. My mom says that I just secretly hate her and when I ask her to stop doing something that’s bugging me I’m really saying go away. I feel so abandoned at this point, sometimes I just want to die if it would make this go away. No one listens or cares, they think I am just making it up. I am so mentally degraded that sometimes I scare myself. It infuriates me that people tell me I’m making it up but I don’t know what else to do. It would be so nice to hear back from people who understand. I’m tired of feeling alone. I’m tired of being told I’m crazy.

    Reply
    • Melissa

      I feel the same way Baileya! You are not alone. Others, including myself, are suffer in the same way. No one understands me either. I actually pushed everyone out of my life. I can’t stand to be around anyone anymore! Everything people do, make me feel like I am going mad. Sometimes I even imagine myself punching someone or hurting someone who is making eating noises, tapping their foot…ect. I don’t think I ever really will, but I feel like I want to. I find that if I mimick the noise or movement that they are doing, it helps relieve it a little, but I still have to leave the room. This is a hard way to live life. I feels like I’m not even living life… just running and hiding from it. I just wanted to let you know that I am scared also and that your not alone. God bless you..

      Reply
  44. Jenna

    Oh my gosh this entire thread of comments is so relieving. I knew that other people experiences misophonia but I had no idea about misokinesia. And now I know I am not alone! I have misophonia to plenty of food noises, but my biggest trigger is my mom’s humming. It is strange however, that I find more “annoyance” the closer I am with a person (ex: family).
    With misokinesia it is the same way typically. Foot wagging, and tapping drive me insane. Nail biting, or picking, even without noise, send me extreme irritation. I am sixteen and I really hope there is more research invested into both of these disorders, if that is what they are classified as.

    Reply
  45. Jennie Parker

    This is so interesting. I googled this tonight whilst watching my husband rub his eyebrows and my daughter play with her fingernails/suck hands/crack all the bones in her body for the past 2 hours. It is absolute torture. In these moments I hate them both with a passion and myself for feeling this way. I only have these feelings for the 2 closest people in my life and whom I love dearly. It started when I was little with my mum wriggling her toes, and other movements over the years. I wish there was something I could do to stop feeling this way, but knowing there are others like me is a small comfort. Unfortunately neither of them get the real agony this causes me and only do it more to annoy me (for the laughs).

    Reply
  46. cice

    This is a blessing reading this. I thought I was just being overly sensitive. Ive had this since the age of five or six. Both my mom and dad would suck on ice cube and I felt like calling CPS; it was torture.
    I have a lot of triggers, but recently its my husband rubbing his beard,he shakes and stirrs everything liquid, and humms when he eats. And he shakes his eating utensil constantly while he chews.

    Reply
  47. Melissa

    I have misophonia and misokinesia also! I do NOT have synaesthesia though. But I do have PTSD and severe social anxiety disorder. I cannot take it anymore!!! I cry every day over this. I can’t stand being so angry and irritated ALL DAY LONG! I can’t take being around anyone. I have no friends, no family and I only have my boyfriend left that I think about leaving every day because everything he does angers me. I feel I am angry all day, every day! I can’t stand the way he breaths, talks, eats, or moves. Or anyone else for that matter. I feel like people do these things on purpose because they know it bothers me although I’m sure their not. The slurping sounds, kissing, moaning, breathing, eating,a lisp when talking, any type of movement at all… drives me crazy! I doesn’t even have to be repetitive movement. Just one move of the leg get’s my blood boiling. I get full of rage and want to cry! I have to eat by myself and try to stay to myself all day. This has ruined all my relationships. I just want to crawl in a hole and be by myself for the rest of my life just so I don’t have to suffer anymore. I need help and have no idea where to turn. I have had this for as long as I can remember, since I was a little girl and I am terrified at the thought that I will have this for the rest of my life. This has and will continue to ruin my life. I must have very severe forms of this, because I can’t work, I can’t have friends, and I don’t want to be around people at all, because I know they will do something to anger me. I don’t want to feel like I am in a rage, angry, irritable or full of hatered towards people anymore. I know it’s not their fault, but my own. I wish there was help out there. I need it! Please! If anyone knows of ways to help or at least reduce these feelings.. please let me know. I even get UNWANTED sexual feelings when these annoying things happen! I just want to scream! Who do you turn to.. especially being this is all relatively new? I would even be willing to be a part of a study in hopes of getting treatment. At least I know I’m not alone. Bless you all…

    Reply
    • Maggie

      Bless you too Mellisa, I feel your pain. Reading your post was like reading about myself. I live a very quiet life to reduce my contact with people but I do worry about my future and one of them being put in a home when I’m too old to look after myself-all that noise!! The thought terrifies me!!I’m sorry I can’t offer a magic cure but I do wish you well.

      Reply
      • Melissa

        Thank you Maggie… it is at least comforting to know that I am not alone. It’s very scary to be so angry all the time. I feel I am a nice person and I have a close relationship with God, so it’s confusing to me as to why I can hate people so much in that moment these things happen. I just don’t don’t want to feel this way anymore. I also have other things I am dealing with, such as loud noises. I can’t stand the radio on loud, the TV, or being around alot of people. I can’t take someone talking loud either. I also can’t stand the feeling of my cloths rubbing on my skin! I have to wear clothing, so whats a gal to do?..lol. I have to sleep without even in the winter. I can’t take anything rubbing my skin. This is a rough life. My sympathy goes out to everyone suffering from this. This is no way to live. I’m tired. I pray that scientist, doctors, psycologist..ect.., will find a cure very soon. This really should be labeled as an illness, because that’s what it feels like. Thank you Maggie for taking the time to reply. My heart goes out for you also. Gog bless you!

        Reply
        • Melissa

          Hi I’m Melissa too 🙂
          I know exactly how you feel about being angry and irritated all the time. I tend to distance myself from others too and I have earphones on to block out the sound whenever I can. It sucks. I don’t know anyone near me suffering from this, so I have no one to talk about except for this website. Let’s hope for a cure!

          Reply
          • Melissa

            Yes! I know how you feel! I have no one to talk to about this either. It really feels like no one understands. I tried talking to my boyfriend about it. I told him it wasn’t my fault and that it is a real condition but he still thinks I’m nuts. I feel like he does things even more now that I told him the things that bother me. He just doesn’t take it serious. So, now I don’t say anything at all. I think that not being able to tell others how I feel inside and how much this effect my life, makes me feel worse. It’s hard to hold all this anger inside. I am so grateful to find others that DO understand and that I can relate to. I actually saw a reply from someone.. I think on this website somewhere, where his mom actually bought him earplugs from surefire. I guess there really good and can block out noise, but your still able to hear conversations. I am going to get a pair.. I pray they work. Now I just need to find something to block out most my sight..lol! Best wishes to you Melissa!

          • Melissa

            You can’t tell others about this cause it seems they do it more just to annoy you. I used to get all irritated with people but now I just pretend those sounds don’t bother me, although on the inside I’m blowing up. You can use your hair to block out the sight, I always do that if I can’t leave the place I’m in. It’s not a cure, but it can bring some relieve.

          • Melissa

            Yes Melissa.. I actually stopped telling people what irritates me also, because your right.. they seem to do it even more. I try to pretend it doesn’t bother me either, although it does. I actually do the hair thing too. I wear my hair down on purpose everyday just for this reason. Also, when I watch TV, I lay down on the couch and put my knees up so I can’t see my boyfriend. I actually have to block my ears with my fingers most the time too because I could hear him breath and lick his lips. When I’m in my car, and my boyfriends with me, I actually have to drive with one eye closed so I can’t see him because he fidgets too much and taps his fingers to the music THE ENTIRE TIME. RRRR!!! I know that not safe, but if I don’t, I’d probably drive us right into a wall from anger! It’s terrible to have so much hate for someone you love so much in those moments. I really do think about leaving him pretty much everyday because I am so tired of being irritated and so angry all day. He’s all I have though. I’m trying so hard to stick it out. I have a counsler for my social anxiety, so next time I see her, I am going to bring this all up. I believe I also have sensory over-responsivity also. Well, I know I do. I hope she can help or at least lead me into the right direction. Thank you for understanding Melissa!

          • Melissa

            I can’t imagine having a boyfriend and suffering from both misophonia and misokinesia. I’m not dating anyone, but whenever I meet someone I keep trying to notice if that person does something that bothers me. Ever since I discover those conditions I don’t think I’m gonna be able to have a long-term relationship with someone. When you mentioned sensory over-responsivity I googled it and I may have that too lol. We’re so messed up hahaha

          • Melissa

            I’m thinking misophonia and misokinesia may be related to sensory over responsivity. It makes sense anyway, it all just has that connection to be sensitive to everything and over stimulated by everything. It’s a thought anyway. Oh.. and when I said that I have to drive with one eye closed.. of course it’s with sunglasses on because otherwise my boyfriend would probably leave me…lol. He has no idea I do it. Anyway, yes, a relationship is very hard. I love him so much, but don’t know how much longer I can this. We have lived together for 6 years now and I discover new things that drive me into a rage each day. Things that he used to that never bothered me, now make me want to stick a knife in my chest!!! (not literaly..lol) I can relate to you in that you carefully observe any potential boyfriends. It’s still a tricky situation though because the triggers that we have apparently make us feel the worse when there coming from someone close to us. So, in like my situation, some things were fine at first and then I actually gained a lot of new triggers throughout the years…. So weird. I think if and when I leave this relationship, I am just going to become a hermit. I’m almost there anyway…lol.

          • Melissa

            Yeah I think we’re almost there lol. It seems those conditions get worse with time. At first, my only trigger was eating sounds and now I have a thousands of them. And yes, they’re related to people we spend the most time with, which makes those conditions even worse. I think I’m learning to keep calm, at least on the outside cause on the inside I just wanna scream lol

        • maggie

          Thank you! Lets hope there will be more research and hopefully a cure one day. Good luck with the earplugs.

          Reply
          • Melissa

            Thank you also Maggie!

    • dawn speed

      hi melissa.
      i do understand you, i to suffer from both, also i cannot stand the site of most my families bare feet, or their wiggling of there feet toes. im ok with friends, but not my husbands or families. they all have to wear shoes. how will i cope on holiday. i also suffer with visual eating motions too. you are not alone. have you added yourself to misphonia face book forum?

      Reply
      • Melissa

        Thank you Dawn. It’s truly comforting to know were not alone. It feels like we are sometimes. Yes.. I understand with wriggling of toes and stuff. I was at an appointment just 2 days ago, and this kid had flipflops on and he keep shacking his foot, making the flipflop click off his foot each time! This went on for 20 minutes! I was ready to rip out all my hair! So, I had to deal with the movement of his foot and the clicking of his flipflops. RRRRR… Anyway.. I didn’t know there was a facebook page. I will definitely check it out and join the page. Thank you for making me aware!

        Reply
        • Baboushi

          I cannot stand lots of noises and movements too. I gave up a class once cos a guy rattled coins in his pockets -constantly. I couldn’t understand how the class mates tolerated it.- I thought THEY not me were mad. My friend rubs her lips from side to side with length of her index finger – maddening. And pregnant women rubbing their bumps – grand for them. I think next time someone annoys me I’ll just make a louder noise or a slower (the slower the more annoying to me) movement.

          Reply
          • Melissa

            Yes!!! I understand your pain! I always wonder why others are not bothered by what I’m bothered by also. I know their not now.. but then and still now, I think that they are and just don’t want to say anything..lol. Yes.. for me, mimicking the sound or movement that is driving me mad will help take some of the tension off. Sometimes, I mimick them hoping that I will aggravate them right back! Though I still don’t know if it does or not. I have now resorted to wearing earplugs ALL day! I am wearing them as I write this. Not sure what else to do, because my boyfriend of 6 years, he walks around all day and I can hear him breathing!!!! He huffs and puffs and makes grunting noises all day long! It’s kind of sad because I love him with all my heart, but EVERYDAY I think about leaving him and being by myself just so I don’t have to suffer anymore. I am beginning to think that isolating myself from everyone and everywhere is the only way for me to be at peace.

  48. Daisy

    This is really interesting – I also have this matrix of psychological oddities. I really wonder if and how they can be connected – something to do with hyper sensitive senses?
    I have real problems with repetitive sounds – pen clicking, my husband snoring makes it very hard to sleep not because of the noise but because it fills my whole senses and makes me furious. I first remember getting furious with the sound of people eating when I was a child, really irritated and hyper aware. I just can’t think of anything else when I notice a sound like that. I use headphones a lot.
    I’m also intensely irritated by repetitive movements – someone twiddling their thumb, for example, or tapping their foot soon overwhelms me with rage. Hand to the face hiding the sight is good but I simply can’t stop thinking about it and hating whoever is doing it.
    I also get triggered by ASMR triggers, and have a mild degree of synaesthesia (I don’t mix things up but have an opinion about the colour of a given letter or number).
    I also have a very sensitive palate and ear for speech and accents, and am very sensitive to touch (unBEARably ticklish).
    I also had pretty bad OCD as a child.
    Are all these just part of a picture of what could be called oversensitive senses? Possibly combined with an obsessive tendency?

    Reply
    • Jenn O

      Okay, so I needed to look up some of your idiosyncrasies such as ASMR, synthesia… that one fascinates me, opinion of colors for numbers and letters. I also have a good palette, although at 63 a lot of intensity of taste is beginning to dissipate/dull. I used to be able to taste any given food preparation and after a few moments, sometimes longer, I could say (not always, but mostly) what the ingredients were. I do mix things up, a lot. I will be looking for something, I know it is blue, like know it… and it will be red etc. I excel at ‘English’ grammar, punctuation, spelling, syntax and reading. Math? I can study, study, study, enough to pass a medical math problem… and the next day I couldn’t tell you how to do the same problem to save my life.

      About the ticklish, the only part of my body that is ticklish is my knees. So much so that I will kick out like a mule if they are even touched. I was taught a cool trick and I will give it to you. It may help, who knows. For the most part and most people, if you can touch the skin of the person doing the tickling, your sensation for being tickled stops! Just like that. Give it a try… touch the other person and see if your sensation stops or at least dulls off a bit.

      Reply
      • Melissa

        Wow! Thanks for sharing your information on what to do when someone is tickling you. I did not know that. I’m definitely going to give it a try next time!

        Reply
  49. Jennifer D.

    Holy Moly Allergic to Sound, I almost crawled out of my skin when near the end of your comment/article you spoke about someone stroking their beard. (I can hardly stand to even write the phrase down.) My two most exasperating situations are whistling and beards. Wouldn’t you know it? Whistling has become the new best form of advertising and in nearly every other commercial. Now we seem to have a new found fad of men growing beards, the bigger and thicker the better. If I even see a beard I want to rip it from his face, if I could stand to touch it. I want to scream at them, ‘you look like a freakin’…’! Do you see how stupid you look? I cannot stand to look again. I just want to die sometimes. No one gets it, not even my husband. If I hear whistling anywhere I have to literally run away, to another aisle, or street, or whatever. I sometimes remember to hold the remote control in my hand so when the sound comes on I can switch the channel fast. Don’t even ask what the pursed lips do to my senses. I have had both misophonia and misokinesia since about six years old. It wasn’t until Kelly Ripa came out on national TV talking about her condition. Sick as it is, I was ever so delighted knowing she had this thing I had too. So, I wasn’t just cookoo after all… However, now I feel real sadness for all of us just carrying on in silence while everyday is a nightmare waiting for us… Thank you for your courage and to everyone that responded.

    Reply
  50. Selena best

    This How I Feel I Get So Mad And Annoyed Irritated Everything When Anybody Have Their Feet Together And Moving It OrRubbing It I Can’t Take It Like I Feel Like Its going to kill me so badly I Knew It Was A Problem For Me When I Said Next Time Somebody Ima Just Look At And see If I Can Not Be Annoyed And 10 secs I just screamed and yelled stop that’s annoying. My other problem is sounds like when people grit their teeth or tapping or the way a pencil sounds when it writes or when people rub their hand against their pants or the walls even somebody rubbing a ball in their hand or chewing on a top it’s kills and I don’t know what wrong it really gets on my nerves it just feel like ima going explode

    Reply
    • dawn

      your not alone. the sound of rubbing feet ughhh. even the site of some peoples feet i cant bare…feel like screaming makes me cringe

      Reply
  51. terrii

    What a comfort to read all of these comments – my story, I’ve just had to hand in my notice at work after 13 years due to a work colleague about two months ago being moved opposite me – her constant shaking tapping slurpping, singing, oh and stomping her cup,or glass down on her desk drove me to distraction. Oh and the continual sniffing when she got a cold. Looking back I can see that there was something going on with certain noises and movement but this at work was clearly the icing on the cake. If only I had known about misophonia before hand I might have been able to explain and handle the situation much better but hey my other ex-work colleagues think I’m mad and my actions by suffering in silence so as not to offend the “trigger” alienated them against me.

    Reply
  52. Rana

    Hi, I did not know that I have it untill last night , my friends noticed that many times before, once I was in a line waiting, the guy infront of me kept moving right left right left right left while he is standing! it made me sick I couldnt breath , I turned and waited in the line while my back facing the line. I feel its getting worse. should we seek help?

    Reply
  53. Julie

    This is fascinating. I have had this since childhood – I am now 52. I never had much trouble with misophonia, just a little with mouth sounds (chewing, slurping, etc.). But, OMG – who knew I had misokinesia? Repetitive hand movements, that’s my issue. My mother who has dementia does this repetitive folding thing – her pant leg, napkins, etc. Makes me crazy! I have to leave the room or distract myself.

    I always attributed this feeling to my father somehow. I’m not sure why, but he had lots of odd, repetitive hand movements and he was emotionally abusive. I guess I just assumed my feelings were related to that.

    Appreciate your article. Now I know I’m not quite as crazy as I thought.

    Reply
  54. Nicola

    I suffer mesokinesia in a big way. Things that don’t even register on other peoples radar has me on the brink of SCREAMING the roof off. I have lost it in public several times and had to ask friends and family to pleeeaaassseee stop x y z because it’s like nails on a chalkboard to me. They usually oblige but tell me I’m a freak!

    Reply
  55. Chris

    Just reading these posts are making me very anxious and sick to my stomach. I am hoping that I can even type these triggers without a panic attack. I hate skin to skin contact. Especially hands. I can NOT hold anyone’s hand and even get angry when I pay for something at a store the cashier brushes my palm with their fingers giving change back. I can’t even handle watching other people rub their hands together or touch anything for that matter. Another trigger are feet. I hate flip flop season. I certainly don’t think mani-pedi’s are cute and the thought of someone touching another’s hands or feet make me sick. A co-worker picks a spot on her chin when she thinks and talks and I always try to make it a funny thing but in reality I just want to smack her fingers and tell her to stop. I can’t handle seeing anything that flies. Butterflies which have the most color are the worst. I panic every time I see anything that flies. Sometimes I swear that I can see things fly out of the corner of my eye and my heart races but when I turn my head it will just be something as simple as a car driving by a couple blocks away. Also flickering lights. They make me feel as though I am crazy. I could go on and on but I am starting to calm down from reading everyone else’s triggers. Thanks for listening.

    Reply
  56. Katie

    I have misokinesia and misophonia and a husband that constantly fidgets and makes annoying noises. It’s driving me absolutely mental!

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Stick in there Katie. I know it can hard (and at times unbearable) but you can do this. Can you put on some other sounds on during mealtimes? (for example music or even the television). And have you invested in a good set of headphones for when you’re trying to read or concentrate?

      Reply
  57. dawn

    I have misophonia and misokinesia. i also cant stand the sight of cetain peoples feet in my family. im ok with shoes on. bt if i see there bare feet. specially wiggling there toes about. god i have to run i feel sick. it started with just my brothers feet. now its most of my family apart from my dad and son. that doesn bother me at all. i also cannot stand my mum brother chewing. yet doesnt bother me with other family or people.. does any one else have selective triggers?

    Reply
  58. Fellow Sufferer

    So I have a lot of these triggers, sight and sound, however I have yet to see anybody like me who goes insane when someone holds a pencil “wrong” or when someone uses a finger other than the pointer finger or thumb to do things traditionally designated to that finger i.e. middle finger on a touch screen or pointing to something on a paper or board with their pinkie finger, etc….
    Anybody else suffer with this?

    Reply
    • Em Ell

      I don’t know if it’s the same as what you’re talking about, but I have a visceral, borderline revolted, reaction whenever I see someone typing on a phone with two thumbs. I always only use one, and the sight of anyone using two is extremely upsetting. My rational brain explains it by reasoning that a QWERTY keyboard on a tiny phone screen is insane and that everyone should use a T9 layout one-handed like I always have, but that seems to just be the genesis of this facet of my case of misokinesia.

      Reply
  59. DAYA

    I have known that I’m bothered by certain sounds for a long time. I had a really bad reaction to television static when I was a kid and the person who was fiddling with the tv was ignoring me while I begged them to make it stop. Chewing is another big thing to me. Generally, I can ignore other people’s chewing if I’m also chewing. I think my mum probably has this also because she HATES when people chew gum near her.

    I hadn’t thought about the movements thing before. I had a friend in college who would go into this persona of stopping his shoulders and shuffling his feet and being annoying and it bothered me so much I used to tackle him when he did it. I used to think it was an evolutionary holdover because he was acting weak and submissive and it made me want to attack but I don’t feel that urge with other types of submission. Also, I cannot handle the way trump moves his hands and the faces he makes, I literally can’t stand to watch him talk.

    Reply
  60. Anonymous

    I’ve been suffering with sensitivity to sounds, noises, repetitive movements, touch, light for as long as I can remember. I am 46 years old and have never been officially diagnosed with any kind of mental or neurological condition, other than pre-menstrual dysphoric disorder after having my kids in my late 30’s. My family and co-workers always thought I was just “fussy” and either dismissed my irritability or made fun of it. After having my kids, I realized that my condition was going to be greatly exacerbated with the many triggers that come along with children….

    Here’s how I’ve dealt with it in some self-destructive and some useful and efficient ways:

    Low dose generic Prozac: I accidentally discovered that this helped decrease the irritability and physical/biological reactions as well as the anger and frustration. After having my last kid, I developed and was diagnosed with pre-menstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). My ob/gyn who also had this condition prescribed the lowest dose of a generic Prozac/ SSRI (serotonin reuptake inhibitor) or as I liked to call it my “happy pill”! It not only made my PMDD bearable but also alleviated some of, if not most of the irritability with the Misophonia and Misokinesia. If you research ssri’s , it might make sense why this was the case. The SSRI’s allow the “happy” feelings so last and squeeze out the other negative feelings. Unfortunately there were many side-effects and after 4 years, I got off the meds… The irritability re-emerged!

    Earphones and earplugs: I panic IF I am ever without them! I usually spend my days wearing one or the other…depending on the environment and circumstances. I have back-ups with me just in case because I’m not sure how I will cope if I have to actually hear my surroundings all the time. I feel like noises and voices are just super amplified! I can’t stand the sound of people’s “S”s and am sensitive to their voice pitch and noise level and even if they are monotonous or whatever. My ex husband has the most annoying nasal and loud voice and when I was single again, I vowed to NOT even attempt a relationship with any man who’s voice I could NOT tolerate! Luckily my boyfriend of 5 years now has a beautiful voice…a little too loud at times but that’s where the earplugs come in…and he understands…thank god!
    My kids are aware of my issues with noise and figetting and they try to please me when I complain but kids will be kids and people will be people and in the end it IS MY ISSUE to deal/cope with…so I do or try…

    Alcohol: I read through the forum and didn’t see anything about alcohol. Sadly, I have to admit that I found alcohol to do WONDERS with this problem! So much so, I became borderline alcoholic! Alcohol just numbs the senses which was a great solution that had to be brought to an end.

    Avoidance: This is impossible!
    Behavior therapy: Didn’t work for me! I tried but just didn’t…

    With regards to figetting and repetitive movements, I’m still struggling! I wish I could cover my peripheral vision! I’m fine if the action is not in my field of vision, otherwise as others have mentioned, I will try to cover my eyes with my hand or move away. Come to think of it, a hat would help but it is hot in my city! My kids fidget ALL THE TIME! It drives me nuts! Also, sometimes my son will touch me or rub me, my arm or my leg for no reason and that bothers me…

    I reiterate I have no other mental or neurological disorders and I’ve thought I might have (SPD) Sensory processing disorder but haven’t confirmed…
    Sometimes I just hate myself for being so difficult to live with and for my anger and sometimes my reactions to people…like I can just immediately HATE someone just for being a source of the irritability and it isn’t even their fault! I carry a lot of guilt and probably is the reason I have not kept or been able to keep friends…it is a lonely, sad and frustrating world to live in when everthing bothers you! I am grateful to have a boyfriend that loves me in spite of all and an ex that HAS to tolerate me and my kids that love me and try to understand!

    I hope more research will be done about this to help us all!
    Until then, wholesale earplugs and constant earphone purchasing! 

    Reply
  61. Liz

    I’m so happy I found this, I had been googling so many times about this. I seriously thought I was the only person in the solar system to suffer from misokinesia (there is a name for it?!).
    Seeing how many comments there are here (and i still have to read them all) I realise I’m not the only one. And most of all, I’m not “inventing” it or pretending it, it’s a condition!? I thought I was just going insane.
    Although seeing that there is no pill I can pop to just get rid of it makes me sad, but then again, that was too much wishful thinking of course.
    I do not have misophonia though, which is weird now that I see that most people seem to have both. I mean, chewing sounds annoy me, but not in the same way as movements do.
    It happens mostly with hand-mouth-movements, hand-on-mustache/beard/lips, leg-rubbing. Ugh, I feel sick just writing about it. It feels like….. I dont’t know, a raging scream inside my brain which electrifies my skin. I totally cannot focus my attention and start to feel blurry, sweaty and I cannot breath.
    I noticed it always happens with movements that are not “necessary”. Like when people scratch their nose, it’s okay, because it probably was itchy, so it’s necessary. But when people start to “caress” parts of their body, it’s like my brain doesn’t understand the reason for it and goes crazy.
    Movie theaters or musicals are hell, I cannot even concentrate on what happens on stage, I only see people’s movements around me and all I want to do is go smack them in the face (I never really do that 😉 )
    I do have a pretty severe form of ADD but I always thought this had something to do with OCD, although I don’t have that.
    I really hope this condition becomes more known, so that it can be taken more seriously and maybe there is a treatment. I’m from Europe (Belgium), I’ve never ever heard anyone talk about it, we have a really good health system though. Now that I know the name, maybe I’ll go to a neurologist, because to me, this seems like something “physical” in the brain, not something that can be resolved with therapy.
    Good luck to you all, I really hope someone finds a solution.

    Reply
    • Melissa W.

      I just wanted to say that newly published research shows that it is indeed physical rather then emotional. The research states that….

      Brain imaging revealed that people with the condition have an abnormality in the emotional control mechanism which causes their brains to go into overdrive on hearing trigger sounds. (In your case seeing a trigger movement)

      Researchers also found brain activity originated from a different connectivity pattern to the frontal lobe. This is normally responsible for suppressing the abnormal reaction to sounds. The researchers also found that trigger sounds evoked a heightened physiological response with increased heart rate and sweating in people with misophonia.

      Also.. in another article that explained it stated that in our misophonia and misokenisis brains… our fight or flight system is sent off for every trigger. Hence the need for us to fight or run away.
      Anyway, I find that it’s comforting to know that it is indeed physical and not mental. Perhaps someday, knowing this, they will find a cure and there will be a magic pill to make it go away. I think psychological issues are a lot harder to deal with then physical. Best wishes.. and welcome! Your definitely not crazy. We all suffer and can relate, which can be comforting in itself, to know that we are not alone!

      Reply
      • Carina

        Melissa,
        If you have the links to the articles you have mentioned, could you post them here? It would help many of us who are trying to explain our condition to our families. I have had many arguments on this issue. Our loved ones don’t understand we have nothing against them (well, maybe there are things… My misophonia tends to get worse when I’m stressed or angry), it’s just a visceral reaction. I think the word “allergy” fits the bill perfectly. It’s an overreaction of the body to a stimulus that is not harmful, but our brains interpret it as such. I feel invaded in my personal space with the noises and certain movements.
        To me, knowing this is neurological rather than psychological is in a way a relief (because it means we’re not crazy), but it’s also sad because if this is physical it may mean psychotherapy can’t help and we may not find a “cure” until the magic pill is developed. 🙁

        Reply
        • Christine Chant

          I had a brain scan and there were no abnormalities, a very full and healthy brain is how it was described, yet I suffer badly from misophonia, I would be interested in the research papers too.
          I find that if I am tired or stressed I am far more intollerant than at other times.

          Reply
          • Melissa W.

            It’s an abnormality that is seen WHILE a misophonia sufferer hears a trigger. I need some time to find the paper I read about it, as it has been a little while. I remember that they compared brains during MRI’s on normal people and misophonia sufferers and that is where the abnormalities come into play and are clearly seen on the brain scans. I’ll do my best to find it.

  62. Nona

    Hi there, yes I have both issues too -for the past 30 years. Caused serious issues as a teenager, I couldn’t sit in the room with my father slurping his meals (Thankfully we repaired our relationship as adults) the feeling was of disgust, and definately ‘flight’ response. The sound of the TV downstairs and on the otherside of the house! Snoring, chewing gum -and the sight of someone chewing gum, hair being twirled around a finger, a ‘jiggy’ foot, leaky headphones, whistling, heavy breathing, sniffling. Unfortunately I’m annoyed with my partner’s eating, sleeping sounds and twirly foot etc. I often might have a pillow strategically on my knee to block the sight of his foot. I have a spare room for a decent night’s sleep. I fiddle with my phone on the train to distract me from other people. I also get on the train after people, so I can sit on the outside. Funny that I never thought to mention any of this when I had CBT for an anxiety issue a few years ago! I definately think ‘exposure’ forcing yourself to stay put and hear the sounds, and then try to think about them differently helps to lessen the response.

    Reply
  63. notalone

    Thank you for your post. I am nearly 60 and thought I was the only one who was so intolerant as to not be able to look at people who play with their hair or beard. I can’t stand it. My darling husband plays with his beard when we are watching TV or at a movie and I actually have to ask him to stop because I can’t concentrate on the movie. I even put my hands up like a shield so I can’t see him do it! I’m so glad I’m not alone. All my life I have thought I was was the only one who was bothered by this sort of stuff. I think I have misophonia as well as I hate the sound of the beard hairs scraping while he plays with it. Jeez, my heart is beating so hard at the thought! Don’t get me started on snoring (my hubby wears a snoreguard), but sometimes the poor man can’t even breathe as it annoys me so much. He breathes loudly through his nose while he’s eating and I look at him and he says ‘what’ and I say you are breathing and he says yes I am. If I didn’t I would die, and luckily we can laugh about it! The feelings I get when my niece plays with her hair drives me mad and I can’t look at her and I want to say stop playing with your hair! but I know I am a crazy one. Haha, so good to read people’s comments.

    Reply
    • jenn

      Sick as it sounds, I am somewhat mollified knowing I am not alone in my self proclaimed insanity. As I age, and I am 63, it is all getting worse! Now it is popular for some men to sport beards and I just want to rip them from their ‘stupid hairy faces’. What is worse, the men are fluffing them or some such to make them look fuller? I can stand a small well kept beard, if I don’t have to look there to long. The thought of even seeing one in a store or otherwise makes my skin crawl. What are we to do…? I don’t want to be so self centered when I know I might not even have eyes to see… but that doesn’t alleviate my misery.

      Reply
  64. Valentina

    Dawn, I don’t know if you still come on here but your post really resonated with me. I too cannot STAND the sight of my parents bare feet especially if they are moving them. It was a nightmare when I lived at home I literally couldn’t sit with them unless they had slippers on and even today when I visit them I can’t stand the sight of their bare feet. Like you, I don’t care about other people’s, just theirs. It also drives me mad when my husband rubs his eyebrows or finds a long hair that needs plucking from them. He fixates on it and continuously plays with it. I can feel my anger rising in me just thinking about it. Other triggers are people who lick the lids of yoghurts (!) hot drink slurping and chewing and crunching sounds. Again it’s much worse with my immediate family for some reason. When my mum licks her lips it drives me mad, she does it when she’s telling a story or speaking. Oh and don’t even get me started on people who take ages to open a packet and just rustle for the longest time. Arrrgh!

    Reply
  65. Sian

    Hey, I suffer from this really bad! It seems at the moment everything annoys me from someone chewing, moving there feet, biting/picking nails. Any small sound or repetitive movement drives me crazy to the point where I feel as though I can’t sit in the same room as people because I get annoyed. Does anyone know how we can stop this irritation? As it’s taking over my life.

    Reply
    • Michelle

      You just said everything I go through every day. My family think I’m going mad. Hell “I” think I’m going mad. To top it off I have 2 boys with ADHD and ASD who bang, tap and make all sorts of wierd noises. I cant even stand listening to my favourite music anymore as it starts getting louder or repetitive half way through the songs. My old dog stinks and I feel like vomiting everytime she opens her mouth and I cant wear any jewellery or clothes that hang or I can “feel”. God, someone PLEASE help! I wasnt like this!

      Reply
      • Melissa W.

        I am the same way with cloths! I can’t stand the feeling of clothing touching me! I am constantly pulling my cloths off my skin and stomach because I can feel them rubbing. I have to sleep in the nude, even in winter, because as I lay in bed and breath, I can feel my cloths rub on my stomach. It drives me mad.. So yes, along with this, misophonia, misokinesia and many other things that drive me nuts, I am irritated ALL DAY long! This is a terrible way to live. I’m getting irritated just thinking about my triggers…

        Reply
  66. Amanda

    I suffer from to relatively mild misophonia mostly when it comes to people chewing with their mouth open, the scrape of forks against teeth, slurping, sometimes rustling paper, and most of all that tinny sound coming from headphones. I have to leave the train carriage when the last one happens.

    When it comes to movements it’s mostly chewing gum that irks me. I find it helpful if I chew gum as well, funnily enough.

    Whenever I mention it to anyone they just say I’m intolerant, and I can’t help but agree.

    Reply
  67. Alex

    I’ve had misophonia since I was about 13 and developed misokinesia at about 23 (I am now 25) though up until reading this article I assumed it was part of my misophonia. I really hope that people like you writing these articles will encourage more research to be done into this awful condition 🙁

    Reply
  68. Misty

    I’ve had misophonia since my early teens, with it worsening in my mid twenties until now (late 30s). I’ve started to experience misokinesia in the last couple of years, with it worsening related to the office environment lately. I’m repulsed by the sound and sight of my co-workers eating at their desks near mine.

    Reply
  69. Julie M

    I’ve had misophonia and misokinesia for years (though I didn’t know that misokinesia was a separate condition until today, thanks to this site), and it’s so gratifying to read all of the posts here. I can totally relate to all of the triggers and the descriptions of blinding rage and crippling panic they cause, and it’s dismaying to me that, even if people in our lives are willing to acknowledge that the condition “is a thing,” they will never be able to really understand what is going on in our brains during a trigger, or that we don’t have any control over it. I’ve developed a number of coping mechanisms to get by, but I really hope through research there will someday be relief from the torment.

    Reply
  70. Max VK

    I’m so glad there’s a name for this. I was ready to go into full-on rage mode while my roommate and his boyfriend were eating Chinese food together and chatting. I had music blasting so thankfully I couldn’t hear them, but even seeing them move around out of the corner of my eye was driving me up a wall. I figured it was a problem because I experience similar feelings of anxious rage when I see my roommate moving around at his desk through the reflection in my laptop screen. God, as if misophonia wasn’t enough of a bummer!

    Reply
  71. Anne

    Hi, I have these things but it’s only with certain things and certain people.
    My husband chewing a carrot drives me crazy, that crunch crunch, and he seems to do it so slowly almost like he’s doing it on purpose, obviously he’s not. Tonight shoved my earphones deep into my ears to try blend out the noise. Another is the pitch that my mom coughs at, it drives me nuts yet other peoples dont? And shaking of my husbands foot and the way he keeps dropping his arm while he’s sleeping on the couch all drive nuts. I was in doctors office once and i could hear this high pitch sound, and i commented how could he stand to listen to that sound and he said not to many people can hear that sound? Also the sound of the vacuum cleaner bothers me unless im doing the vacuuming….and don’t get me onto snoring, i almost feel like doing my husband bodily harm when he does.
    Anyway im sure there is more I just cant think right now.
    Does that sound like those conditions you mentioned?

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Hi Anne, that sounds exactly like you have misophonia and misokinesia (which are part of the same disorder broadly speaking). I share most of those triggers with you as do, I’m willing to bet, most misophones on this website. You are not alone or crazy!

      Reply
  72. Jessi

    I’ve known about my mesophonia since I had brain surgery (right temporal lobectomy) and my symptoms got considerably worse…or should I say my ability to cope with the constant annoyance deteriorated and rage increased. Being allergic/annoyed/afraid of certain sounds has always been a part of my life. My sister is the loudest ‘cruncher’ of food and I was constantly shouting at her to ‘be quiet! eat softly! It’s already dead but sounds like it’s still being slaughtered in your mouth!’ And I can vividly remember getting annoyed, angry and aggressive towards my mother who always seemed to eat with a sloshing, very wet sound…swooshing food from one side of her mouth to the other.
    I also hated the way she would masticate the air when she slept (make chewing motions and sounds in sleep). I didn’t just feel this hatred towards others eating and drinking but I was also overly conscious of the sounds I made while eating. I couldn’t stand to hear myself eat, chew, swallow and was self-conscious that others could hear me. This lead to some eating peculiarities, where I would only eat pureed or soft food that required very minimal chewing and made very little noise. My pet hate is steak because it needs to be chewed so much. I eat all varieties of food now but I am always the slowest eater, I think because I chew very carefully so as not to make a noise. This aversion to my own bodily sounds also extends to urination and defecation. If I believe someone can hear then my body is unable to perform these functions. Having to use public facilities, in extreme circumstances, is fought with much anxiety and fear. I avoid these situations, often going 12 hours without toileting when at school and work. My husband tends to snore through his nose and like whistling it fills me with rage. So much so that I find myself blocking his nose so that he is forced to open his mouth to breathe (he doesn’t seem to wake up to this). My daughter wipes her nose often with the palm of her hand and I always over-react but can’t stop it. I have a similar response when people lick their lips, whistle and rattle/rustle packets over. I could not stand my babies sucking on my breast but feeding from a bottle was different somehow. Like others I had put the mesokinetic triggers down to the sensitivity to sound associated with mesophonia. Do we know which areas of the brain are responsible. I have had epilepsy since 2 years who’s focus was in the right temporal lobe but seizures would spread to the whole brain. Post-surgery I developed seizures again only now they originate in my left temporal lobe. I know that both of these areas are associated with memory and language, communication. I wonder if a distorted sound memory associated with speech contributes to the extreme emotions associated with mastication and breathing which originate in the same areas for speech, the mouth and nose.

    Reply
  73. Theresa

    Wow. It’s nice to find “my people.” I have horrible misophonia. My triggers are generally chewing related – gum snapping being my worst trigger – but most clicking or snapping sounds make me, well, snap. I don’t panic, I become enraged and need to remove myself from the situation. I think I definitely have a touch of misokinesia, but it is very much related to my misophonisa. The thing I hate the most is seeing people chew with their mouths open – because I know what it sounds like, even if it’s across the room and I can’t hear it. When I see people chew gum with their mouths hanging open, it feels me with nonsensical rage. It’s such a strange thing, and something other people truly don’t understand. I currently sit next to a gum snapper at work, and it’s all I can do to keep my composure. I keep headphones in my ears, which isn’t very professional, but probably more professional than snapping and freaking out in the office?

    Reply
  74. Samantha Aughtman

    Thank God I found this website. I’ve been suffering from both disorders since I was about 6 or 7 years old. Any noises, except white noises, irritate me to an unhealthy level. Both of my parents bite and pick their fingers repetitively, which honestly, makes me want to kill myself sometimes. I often yell at the person for their incessent noises or movements, whether it be very minute or particularly evident. My Aunt visited my father and I when I was 13 (I still am), which meant that she would sleep in my bed and I would sleep in the same bed as my father (my mother left, so we had no furniture). We had turned off the lights at 11 that night, but I didn’t fall asleep until 4, which was when I moved to the couch to sleep. My father’s snoring was driving me up the wall, and I tried everything I could to stop the sound from reaching my ears, including:
    – Uselessly holding the pillow over my ears
    – Playing classical music on full volume with earbuds
    – Trying to ignore it
    Absolutely nothing worked. Even when I moved to the couch, I didn’t fall asleep for another hour because I was thinking about the noise. My friends must think I’m crazy because I am so irritated by the smallest of sounds. My father told me that it could be related to my intelligence; my IQ is 144, but I am not sure if they are connected. I have started seeing a counselor for the divorce and the sensory issue, but she has not tried to fix it yet; we are very early is the sessions. My father also smacks his lips about half of the time he eats, and we always eat together. He also blows his nose every 20 minutes as a result of allergies. Even the sight of anybody eating makes me feel like the world is ending. I will think about the various noises from various people throughout the day, and I end up snapping at people I don’t want to. It’s an endless cycle that will never stop because nobody will change just for me. That would be narcissistic and ridiculous. I cannot even play sports because of my absurd perfectionist attitude. The worst part is, I can’t fix the issue and I’ve noticed that I’m starting to avoid social settings in which I don’t know the people that I’m with. People at school must think I hate them because I cannot help but give them a dirty look if I can associate a noise with them. I also will remember every single obnoxious noise they make, and that will be encrypted into my brain for as long as I can remember that person. My parents get angry at me when I’m annoyed at them for noises or movements they make, which makes me feel like a nuisance to everybody else. Have any of you solved your sensory issues?

    Reply
    • Carina

      Hi Samantha,
      I can so relate. I cannot eat with my family because of the chewing or sleep in the same room as my husband because of the snoring, even if I use earplugs. To me, the only thing that works is removing myself from the trigger. Music can work if the sound is not too loud. But it all boils down to educating the people around you (not everyone, just those you can trust) that this is not just fussiness, but a real condition that causes a lot of suffering.
      You mentioned in your comment you have a high IQ and wonder if there is a connection. Being gifted myself, I had the same question and asked a psychologist who specializes in gifted people. She confirmed that there are many gifted people who have sensory processing disorders or related issues such as misophonia. I asked around and other gifted people I know on FB have misophonia. So at least you know you’re not alone. 🙂
      I strongly suggest, if you haven’t done this already, to read all you can about both giftedness and misophonia. The thing about giftedness is that it doesn’t always look like a gift. There are many challenges which can be very hard to handle and can cause depression, anxiety, relationship trouble… When I began reading about this topic, I understood many quirks about myself (not just misophonia, but so many other things) which previously made me think I was slightly crazy. Well, we’re not crazy. It’s just that our brains are wired a little differently. I recommend you read Dabrowski’s theories on overexcitabilities and positive disintegration. Take care!

      Reply
      • shanna

        I am also what is called a highly sensitive person (HSP) and an empath. It can really drive one quite mad when you can notice every minute detail when you walk in a room and then take on the emotions of the people around you. I am now 41 and spent most of my life wondering how other people can’t see or feel what i think is glaringly obvious.
        I have coped with this by just taking a step back and recognizing what is going on and how i feel about it and realize that i either need to remove myself or find a way to decompress the bubbling feelings that arise.
        I have to have music playing constantly. I can’t stand to be in silence, unless i am sleeping. I have been using a really good set of ear plugs and an eye mask for about 7 years now and absolutely can not go to sleep without them.
        It is so weird to me that a noise can bring the intensity of anger that it does.
        I also wondered if my adversion might have been due to having very severe ear infections as an infant/toddler or are we just wired this way?

        Reply
  75. Arianna

    Hello all, I am 39 yrs old and didn’t know what I was going through until I did some research. I usually can handle certain noises but there are times noises seem to turn up louder.someone chewing, moving around, sniffling, and i turn into a crazy woman. My husband has a habit of grabbing his facial hair and rubbing his hands on his face and i hear that noise like nails or a chalkboard. I suffer from anxiety and adhd. I’m just glad that I have a name for this medical condition.

    Reply
  76. Rachel

    I can’t stand it when people shake their leg in class. I end up having to hold up my test or a piece of paper so I don’t see it. It conpletely disrupts my focus. I wish there was a place where I could go to take me tests alone.

    Reply
  77. Shanna

    The earliest trigger I can remember was when my brother was getting married. He was holding the hand of his soon to be wife at the alter and was continually rubbing his thumb across the top of her hand. This was 20 years ago and i can still see it plain as day and wondered how she could be standing it.
    I can’t take anything repetitive moving across my own skin, such as my shirt blowing in the wind while on a motorcycle. I have to make sure i am wearing something tight.
    I can also see my coworker (right now) out of the corner of my eye, shaking her leg which causes her boobs to wiggle back and forth. I can’t stand it!
    My boyfriend’s dog will continually lick his hand and i get so angry and tell to stop or move somewhere that i can’t hear and see that going on.
    I am so happy to know that i am not crazy and there are other people like me out there!

    Reply
  78. J

    I have grapheme-color synesthesia which means I see words in color. While this has been a gift in many ways, the more I learn about this condition, the more I realize how much of my life is connected to it. I suffer from both misophonia and misokinesia, and I’ve always had a hypersensitivity to loud sounds as well (as they correspond to bright colors for me). While I’m a capable, functioning adult, it still boggles me that so many things in my brain can be interconnected! Thank you for writing. Cheers.

    Reply
  79. Julie

    So grateful to hear so many people with the same issues. People without this just cannot understand, loved ones or colleagues. They think we’re being precious or crazy or rude. Although I do think eating apples and open mouth chewing is purposefully rude haha. I know mine was brought on by mother as she has the same and our dinners were torture for us kids as we had to be noiseless. My sister has held extreme fear of eating ‘normally’ for a long time and suffered depression. I’ve been on the verge. As maternal grandparents also had extreme issues I won’t go into, I wonder if this is hereditary, either genetic or socialised…would love to participate in research on it and just not have it anymore!

    Reply
  80. Karen J

    Help! It is torture to try to find a seat in a restaurant or at church where I won’t have to watch someone jiggling their leg. Why can’t people sit still. When did it become acceptable to be a perpetual motion machine. Has anyone found anything that will help?

    Reply
  81. Kiera

    I suffer from misophonia and misokinesia. Me and my ex of 4 years broke up and I think it has a lot to do with it, he always says I’m complaining or I complain too much, and I do lol. I ask him to stop yawning, chewing, moving his foot, scratching, etc. anywhere I go and I notice I left my headphones at home I panic because I know I won’t be able to get through the day. I finally convinced my mom and grandmother to thinking I wasn’t crazy and it’s an actual disorder, but they still find it hilarious

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Hi Keira,

      I feel your pain! In my experience asking people to stop/alter their behaviour doesn’t really help. It tends to just create more confusion and hurt followed by an atmosphere/tension which then makes everyone more stressed and exacerbates the problem further. I try to remove myself from particularly high stress situations and work on my own coping techniques. It’s no silver bullet but you get good at adapting to your environment and predicating trigger situations!

      Reply
      • Kiera

        One thing that really helps me cope is to mimic the sound that’s annoying me. When someone yawns loudly I have to yawn loudly right after them to not be annoyed, or my biggest annoyance, when people make the noise when sucking something off their fingers, do it enough and I will kill you lol, but no, if I keep mimicing that noise most of my anger goes away. (But I still look crazy copying everything they do)

        Reply
  82. Alicia

    Omg yes i thought i was the only one, i try to explain to people and they think i’m crazy and doing it for attention because it ain’t a big thing and people don’t know about it,, people often say i know i hate people who chew loudly but it’s not the same at all i feel alone with all of this stuff so it’s great to know there’s who go through the same thing,,i’ve never mentioned the sight one to people but it’s also bothers me,, i also get one where when i’m leaning against or people are touching me and they type on their phones or rubbing really irritates me aswell is that just me or anyone else ??

    Reply
  83. Marie

    I can’t stand it when people touch their heads in front of me.

    Reply
  84. Janet Mott

    I’ve had this for as long as I can recall, along with misophonia. I didn’t know of this term until earlier this week – so here’s to another label and diagnosis :-S. This is one of the hardest things to cope with and manage and I feel like I’m failing at it all of the time. I can’t even tell you how much time, effort and money (more than $50,000.00) I’ve spent over the years on therapy and tools. It’s so debilitating and damaging and no one ever really understands. I’ve had some small gains/progress as a result of communication and I need to focus more on those successes but ultimately, this still leaves me feeling empty, lonely, hurt, and as being the catalyst, the carrier of hurt to those around me, especially my family. And I keep working at working on me – working on my reactions and responses – what I do. I try very hard to take responsibility and to be proactive. I try. And it’s exhausting and scary and sad. I am grateful my doctor informed me of this link and to this term because it seems to legitimize and validate what I go through more so. So thank you for posting.

    Reply
  85. Sara

    While my sound triggers are longstanding, I seem to have developed visual triggers within the last few years: the look of husband’s middle finger when he curls it to pick his thumb cuticle. The sight of his fingers wrapped around a piece of food. The particular movement of his jaw when he eats. My mother’s mouth movements when she chews. The sight of an eyebrow being raised, or of a bow-legged person walking. I can feel my blood pressure rise as I type this. My husband has learned not to personalize my outbursts over sound, but I don’t think he can grasp my “visual” issues.

    Reply
  86. Joy

    I am 62 and have been dealing with sounds bothering me since I was 14! It mostly started with my dad who like to watch TV late at night. So I had to wear earphones and listen to music to drown out the TV! Little children don’t get on my nerves but mostly just adults. I can’t stand to listen to them eat or watch them eat I don’t like to be in crowded restaurants because I see and hear everything! I don’t like to go to movie theaters because people are just noisy. I mostly hate to hear people crunch their food are smack. And some people bother me more than other people in my family. I will just go in my room. Through the years I’ve learned to turn on fans everywhere I go and people think I am the weird one but I think they are! Which ends up making me a loner. I don’t like to become friends with people too often because they will start getting on my nerves. So I’ve learned to just like them from a distance. I understand how all you feel because I like to get away from people as fast as I can. My best friend is also like this so we actually get along and it feels good to have somebody who knows how you feel. We know what the other one doesn’t like to hear so we do not do them around each other. My husband passed away 7 years ago and I literally will never get married again.

    Reply
  87. Sunny

    Thank God i have seen this website and went through almost all the comments. I feel relaxed to know that there are many others who suffer like me. i never came across anybody suffering like me till date. I am suffering with both visual and noise triggers..folks @ Allergic to sound..You are doing a great job bringing awareness to many..The awareness that the other person is fine and you have a disorder itself is a great help…hope you guys will come up with some solutions for these issues..All the best for your Research..God bless..

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Thank you for your kind words Sunny, I’m so glad you’re finding the site useful.

      Reply
  88. Sean

    Good Day All!

    Great site! I am 57 years old and have put up with Misokinesia and Misophonia for as long as I could remember. When I was little I can remember my Mom sitting with her feet on an ottoman and rubbing them together. It would send me into a fit, but I didn’t know why. I have never said anything because I thought people would think me nuts, as I still feel sometimes. I have tried to analyze my feelings as these things happen and I just can’t figure it out. It has ruined my life basically and I feel so lost with it.

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Welcome Sean, I’m glad you’re finding the site helpful. I get really freaked out when people rub their hands together!

      Reply
    • Julie M

      I hear that, Sean! I’m about your age and my experience as a kid was much the same. I take comfort in finally knowing I’m NOT crazy, and that I’m by no means alone in this. I hope that someday through research there will be a way to alleviate the suffering.

      Reply
  89. Sadie D

    I am commenting here to vent because I feel like I can’t tell anyone in my life about this. I first showed signs of misophonia around age 7. I would go to bed, hear the TV, and then would angrily huff and puff into the living room to cry and scream at my family to turn the TV down even though it was practically the lowest it could go. I felt like such a BATCH of cookies. Sleeping in the same room with my parents was a nightmare since they both snore and I could not stand the sound of my mom’s heavy breathing even when she was awake. But, my misophonia eventually decreased in severity and hasn’t been an issue for a long time (praise god), not like it used to anyway.

    But, I guess it has shifted to misokinesia. Just dandy.

    what is REALLY bugging me now is my good friend, we’re roommates. We are both in college, and we have 2 lectures together 3x a week, and if I sit next to her, forget about focusing. I swear, I think it is anxiety related, but she is entirely incapable of sitting still for a single moment—she is always MOVING some body part. She is either biting her nails (which completely repulses me), stroking her hair (UGHHHHH), or rubbing her hands SOMEWHERE on her body. Like rubbing and massaging her arms and it makes this scratchy irritating sound and sometimes in conversation she will just lift her hands to her chest and rub it and then glide her hands over her pudgy stomach and it is so distracting and repulsive and it puts me soooo on edge. Why are you touching your boobs like that?? in front of people!!! in public!!! I have been avoiding watching movies with her because she plays with her long hair the entire freaking time, picking it up from the back of her head, extending her arm, and running her fingers through. Ain’t no escaping that from the peripherals. There has not been a single time she has not played with her hair for 4/5 of the movie. I think its the fact that I know this will never end, she cannot change, she has some weird anxiety thing or ADHD, idek that makes her constantly have to move and touch herself. The fact that I know it will never end, and I can expect to be annoyed time and time again by her, is what is destroying me. Like okay, some people are triggered by eating noises or pen clicking but these are shorter average amounts of time. I’m guessing she will always have hair and nails and therefore will alwaaaaysssss be doing something with them. I literally wish I could destroy my peripheral vision. 2 years ago we would study together and she would play with her hair and it couldn’t stand it so much to the point that I finally told her about it. And it worked! she mostly stopped. But I just feel so so uncomfortable with the idea of asking her again. I feel like she is going to tell my other roommates and everyone is going to think I’m a monster. It’s like she forgot how i confronted her before, I explained my misokinesia and everything and it worked, but I guess it just totally skipped her mind after I went abroad the following semester. I feel like I would hang out with her more, study at the same table as her, watch more movies, so many more things but she just has thee most annoying habits and I feel like my misokinesia is drastically inhibiting me in being a good friend.

    In ADDITION, I just noticed the past 2 girls I worked with that I sit RIGHT next to for 5 hours on the computer…like to play with their hair. One would grab her long flipping hair and ferociously twirl and twirl and twirl and the bracelet on her same wrist would make this jingly noise and it was loud and incessant for the whole 5 hours. I could block peripherals but not that ridiculous sound. I just CAN’T ANYMORE. WHY DOES EVERY GOD DANG PERSON HAVE TO PLAY WITH THEIR HAIR AND BITE THEIR NAILS!!!!! is it so hard to just sit there, with still hands???? Is that too much to ask!!!! other people around you have EYEBALLS to see and EARS to hear you do your stupid little cringe-worthy, physical pain-inducing, grotesque habits.

    I know none of you read this whole thing. I just had to get my freaked up emotions out there.

    Reply
    • Julie M

      I totally empathize with you, Sadie. People playing with their hair is torture to me, and it seems everybody with long hair does it. Riding the subway every day to work is a nightmare. I’ve found many ways to cope with my misophonia (earplugs with mp3 of the ocean really works), but I don’t know WHAT to do about the visual triggers. You can talk again to your friend and hope for understanding, but you can’t make the whole world stop playing with their hair!!

      Reply
    • Melissa W.

      We all understand what your going through. Just reading your post, made me feel rage towards that girl and her fidgeting! My boyfriend does the same thing.. non-stop fidgeting! It’s enough to drive a person mad.. literally. Sometimes.. just sometimes… I even wish I was blind or deaf, to help take some of this weight off. It’s like I am angry and irritable all day long. It’s an awful way to spend one’s life.. it really is. Anyway, how about if you tell your friend how by playing with her hair, like she does, she is going to end up with split ends and breakage. Which is all true. Playing with ones hair is very unhealthy. Perhaps.. it will make her be more aware of what she’s doing and she’ll stop.. or at least lessen the hair twirling. It’s worth a try. Also.. you always have the choice to not have relations with her anymore. I know it sounds harsh, but being angry and full of rage everyday, is even harsher… best wishes.

      Reply
      • Sadie D

        Ah the “an awful way to spend one’s life”, so true. Its insane how these horrid feelings can result from the tiniest little occurrences that no one else notices. I often have this fear of being around my friend because I have so deeply associated her with her annoying movements. I really do not want to go to my lectures anymore. At least none of my other friends do this/annoy me? The thing is, she is not just a friend, she is one of my best friends and I would never want to cut off our friendship. We also live together lol. I am wondering how you stand being around your boyfriend…does he know you’re annoyed?

        Reply
        • Julie M

          From what I’ve read and experienced, it’s often those who are closest to you that elicit the most intense reactions. I also live with a boyfriend who, through no fault of his own, has several habits that drive me out of my skin, some auditory, some visual. He is aware of my condition but I don’t think he’ll ever understand it. At any rate, he tries not to annoy me, but it’s not always possible. Sometimes we make it a joke, sometimes it’s not a joke at all and I suck it up rather than lash out at him, but the bottom line is communication. Does your friend understand that it’s not just a quirk, but something that is physically out of your control?

          Reply
          • Sadie D

            I do not think she understands, because I haven’t told her since about a year and a half ago. I just feel like it would be difficult for me to tell her to stop because she is
            a l w a y s doing these things and I think it is deeply engrained in her, some sort of soothing/coping mechanism for her anxiety? I don’t think she notices what she’s doing and I think I would make her feel bad about herself by bringing it up and calling attention to her own habits. I just feel so stupid asking someone to stop doing something when they really aren’t doing anything wrong. It was one thing to ask her to stop when we were studying together and she sat right in front of me. but now she does all the time…how do i explain that I want her to stop when she watches a movie, when she is sitting in lecture? Technically not in my view…like hey, when you do that I literally cannot get you out of my sight even when you are hardly in my sight because my peripheral vision is very sensitive. And once I do tell her, if she doesn’t really understand, I think she will start noticing the way I try to block her out of my peripherals with hand/arm placement…it would just be awkward. I think I need to try to suck it up and stick it out for now. But, thats not to say I reach a breaking point and finally force myself to tell her. It just depends how much more I can handle…

        • Rachel

          It does seem like often the ones who we’re closest to are the ones who trigger us the most. Which sucks. My wife does certain things that don’t bother me in other people. It’s so distressing to want to scream bloody murder at the people you love the most.
          I have noticed that since reducing caffeine for a separate issue has calmed my miso issues a lot. Obviously everyone is different and what works for me might not work for anyone else but it could be worth trying if you consume a lot of caffeine. Huge hugs.

          Reply
        • Melissa W.

          Yes.. I did eventually tell my boyfriend after 2 years living together. I waited so long to tell him because he was as bad at first and then the fear of looking crazy. After I found out it was a real condition with a name, I gained the courage to tell him and well… he still thought I was crazy. He laughs about it and has even jokes with a few of his friends about how stupid things make me so angry. Now, I wish I never even told him. I guess if a person does not suffer the same, they have absolutely no understanding of how it feels and never will understand. Now.. being I told him, it feels as though he does these things even more. My triggers with him are any noises and movements. He too, fidgets all day long. With his shaking feet and twideling fingers. Also, he makes huffing. grunting and puffing noises.. every time he moves! He also slurps and chews his food with his mouth open with every bite. I now wear earplugs from the time I get up till the time I go to bed. Not fun. Oh and also being i told him, I now feel that he does all these things on purpose! I’m sure he’s not, but I just feel that way. Like he’s doing it out of spite, now that he knows. Anyway, like I mentioned.. I wish I never told him. It makes me hold a lot of anger towards him, being he knows and does not care. I think about leaving all the time, but am scared because I also suffer from severe social anxiety have no one else. I have no family either, so if I ever leave him, I will have absolutly no one, at all. Also.. I love him very much and I realize that this is not his fault, it’s mine, and I don’t want to regret ever leaving him over this condition. I’m beginning to realize though, that if I don’t leave soon, I may regret living with such anger, hatred and rage for so long instead. It’s a lose, lose situation. Anyway, I understand and can appreciate that you would never want to cut ties with your best friend. I am currently trying risperidone, in hopes it will take the edge of this rage. I’ll let everyone know how it goes and if it helps at all or not. I’ve tried a lot of medications, some naturals supplements too, so far, no luck..

          Reply
          • Jennifer D. Oswald

            Hi Melissa, I am also taking risperidone. So far, my rage seems less, but still ‘off the charts’. Sometimes I wonder if there will come a time when I choose to no longer go into public. I am interested in hearing how your experience with risperidone goes. On another note, if I may… I am married 37 years to the same man. While he can be unsympathetic and aloof, he never has and never will make fun of my misophonia, misokinesia, anxiety, etc. He certainly would never discuss it with anyone other than a person that had my best interest in mind. Please understand that people do not change who they are. More importantly, we do not change who they are, nor is it our place to do so. What we endure is challenging enough as it is without the support of someone so close to us. Your boyfriend has no right to make your experience any more difficult than it already is. Trust those instincts of yours, girl. I liken mine to my best friend, sitting there, telling me what I need to do. If you are being treated in any way that makes you feel less than you are… you know what to do, what must be done. He is not the man you hoped or thought he was. Take best care of yourself. (Just an old woman’s point of view.)

  90. jared

    ive had alot of these of these little tics that anger me aswell, but ive not read anyone speak about someone drinking, not just drinking ,but seeing them take 2-3-4 drinks back to back enrages me for no reason i can think of other then its simply annoying.

    Reply
  91. Greg

    I sit next to a dude at work who spins his earphones in his hand while he talks on the phone. I was wondering why I find it so irritating – to the point where it made me feel ill – and this was the first link I looked at when I googled it. Thank you.

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      No problem Greg, I hope some of the info on this site helps

      Reply
  92. Elaine F.

    I knew I probably suffered from misophonia, but now I know I probably also suffer from misokinesia. Going to meetings and public places sometimes drive me crazy. I get sooo angry and annoyed when I see people twirling their hair, pacing back and forth while talking (on phone or giving presentations), taping pens or pencils, shaking leg or foot when sitting…any repetitious movement! Combine this with my my worst misophonia triggers (smacking lips, chewing gum or ice, clearing throat constantly, heavy breathing) and my anxiety goes sky high!!!

    Reply
    • Ange

      Hair twirling does it for me too. Makes me irate. Makes me nearly vomit. I’m so happy I’m not alone.

      Reply
  93. Dolly Ann

    I think I only have misokinesa a little bit but it’s definitely there. What’s interesting is that people putting chapstick really bothers me. Especially if they’re doing it for a long time. There was a chick in class once that was putting chapstick on just her bottom lip for at least 5 minutes. I kept on looking at the clock to see how long she was doing if for and t surprised how many minutes were passing and she still was putting on chapstick. I just wanted to rip the chapstick from her hands and throw it in the trash. It was so distracting.
    For me I get bothered more by sights and sounds if I dislike the person and I’m curious if other people are the same way

    Reply
    • Sara

      Unfortunately, I seem to be triggered the most (both with sounds and sights) by people I like and love. It stinks.

      Reply
    • Jennifer D

      Oh, Dolly Ann! I am chuckling here, reading your post. Because I have and still do nearly the exact same thing. It is just good to know we do it together. Thank you.

      Reply
  94. Russell

    I have had some misophonia and misokinesia for most of my adult life (I am now 60). In my teens I was stoned so much of the time that I think these were suppressed but when I quit those habits my symptoms grew. A few years ago I finally figured out that I have (mild?) Asperger’s and that is a bad combination. All are a huge stress on a marriage. Snoring and heavy breathing — not from heavy exercise but from obstructed or out of shape issues — are the worst audible triggers and I have slept in a separate room for the last few years. We both miss the contact but at least I get sleep now (she snores a lot) and I don’t have that constant anger over it. There us a huge incompatibility because my wife has to be constantly doing done thing and moving. She knits as spins yarn on wheels and on drop spindles, even on walks, there us no escaping it. It is great for her and I am glad it makes her happy but it makes me nuts and irritable, as it is both constand motion and noise, even if the sound is relately quiet. If she is not spinning fiber the she is jiggling her feet or bouncing her legs. Another trigger is the unnecessary sound of keystrokes when someone uses their cellphone in a neighboring stall in the restroom at work. It makes me clench and has even led to constipation. My workplace installed new high pressure flush toilets (90 dB sound level) that I find almost painful to hear, and that doesn’t help either.

    It is great to read that I am not alone in this, but I do wonder how much longer until I am forced to live alone. It is not an economic possibility to choose that because I am the sole earner in the family, with one teen still at home and subsidizing the adult child who moved out. I have learned to walk away and seek solitude when needed and then fight the Asperger’s anxiety over what people think of me for doing that. Still, that is better than enduring what feels like torture.

    Reply
  95. Jennifer

    As I read through these posts I think, “There are so many of us. How has this gone unnoticed until now? There are so many of us. How do we all have the same basic signs and symptoms? There are so many of us. How does this just now have a name of its own? There are so many of us…

    Reply
    • James

      Jennifer, I am glad you are having the same thoughts as I am. I am wondering if there is more research going into this. With as many comments as are on this page, there are probably 100x more people who did not comment or have yet to see this.

      Reply
  96. Stephanie

    Oh I’m so glad to see this! Now, how to “overcome” it. Please? ☺ Mostly peripheral movements and many people talking loudly at once. My husband plays his tablet game and moves his arm/hand all over the place quickly to touch the screen. I can’t take it. Shaking his foot, nose picking. I want to throw a blanket over him. Lol. My boss hums to herself. Ugh. I also have hyperosmia, sensitivity to smells. Yay! I’m learning how to meditate and breathe.

    Reply
    • Julie M

      Oh boy, Stephanie, you’ve got it bad! Love the reference to wanting to throw a blanket over your hubby. I’m sure a lot of us can relate to that.

      I have misophonia and misokinesia so I hear ya. I don’t think I have hyperosmia, but I do have an intense aversion to mint; it causes a gag reflex. I can’t go into the bathroom after someone has brushed their teeth, and just imagine what it’s like for me at the dentist! I have to train my hygienist. So often on the subway in NYC I get the trifecta of someone right next to me chewing mint gum. The smell, GAG, the sound of the snapping and chewing, and the sight out of the corner of my eye of jaws masticating. It’s torture, and the offenders never know what they’re putting me through.

      I have a coping mechanism for the sound triggers (mp3 of the ocean with me at all times), but have yet to come up with how to cope with visual triggers or the mint thing (which I’m sure is tied into the other two). I’m hoping that research is advancing so that one day there will be relief for all of us.

      Reply
  97. Ange

    I am so happy I found this article.

    I have this, and before today, I didn’t know it had a name.

    I become irate at my partner, who constantly twirls his hair. In fact, as mentioned in the article, I experience nausea when he does this!

    Now that I know this does exist, and others have it as well, I feel so much more prepared to deal with it.

    Thank you!

    Reply
  98. Bonnie

    It’s so wonderful to find out I’m not alone! I’ve know for a couple of years about my misophonia, but have felt terrible about what I now know is misokinesia – I thought I was crazy. Maybe I am, but I’ve got company. 🙂

    I’m 64, so my default method of dealing with this is being mostly a hermit. I finally gave myself permission to leave events where people are driving me crazy. At church I go to the basement to calm myself, then when the service has gone on to a different part, return to my seat.

    But I can’t do much about my husband – & he drives me nuts. He thinks it’s something I can control. 🙁

    Since I can’t, I wear earplugs for the sound part. For the visual stuff I look away or close my eyes – unless I’m driving. If I can drive with one hand I put my right hand up so I can’t see his finger going round & round & round…O-O

    Reply
  99. Joanne Baker

    I am a 52 year old Woman. I have worked in the Mental health since 1999. I don’t no how I have coped in hand overs every morning. People clicking pens.. vigouresly moving legs. Sucking and looking at their nails. I never hear hand over. I feel I am bein tortured. No one else seems disturbed.

    Reply
  100. James

    I have known I had misophonia for a while and always thought that it did not fit all of the symptoms. For me, most of the sounds that bothered me were associated with visual triggers. I started out being triggered almost exclusively by my mother and brother and then as I entered elementary school, I began to be triggered by the rest of my family and eventually classmates. I remember being in church and digging my fingernails and scratching my arms so hard that they would be raw as my mother sat beside me swinging her crossed leg (making no noise). In class, many kids would swing both their legs during tests and I found this unbearable. I would have to leave the classroom and cool off for a while.

    Now I am in the last part of college and it only gets worse and worse. I have started mentioning the things that bother me to my mother and it makes her angry. She always makes comments like, “do you not even want me to breathe?” and makes scenes by telling everyone around her, “he won’t let me move at all!” It is extremely frustrating that no one understands the physical pain this causes me. And I hate scenes so it is equally as embarrassing. My eyesight gets hazy and I get extremely dizzy and cannot focus. I feel the irrational rage begin to boil inside of me. If I do not leave, find some way to bring myself physical pain, or stop the movement, I cannot function. I am afraid people are going to start to think that I am going crazy.

    I honestly have no idea where to go from here. I hate coming home because I cannot escape these triggers. And every time I do come home, more and more triggers are added. And it is not that these triggers just randomly start to bother me, it is that she adds new movements all the time that she doesn’t even realize. She started with swinging her legs and rubbing her feet together. Then she added tapping her thumbs on the steering wheel. Next she started rubbing her hands during dinner. The past few months, she has started to noticeably clean her gums with her tongue.

    Just writing this, I am on the literal edge of sanity. I hope others can understand what I am going through. I feel so alone with this invisible, irrational pain. I would take any physical or emotional trauma (both of which I have experience many times) over how this makes me feel.

    Reply
  101. Angel

    The only way I can make it through the work day is by wearing headphones to block out sounds. I’m stressed out by hearing the young woman across the room wrinkle her chip bag and chew with her mouth open, the man on the other side of the cubicle scraping his yogurt container for five minutes straight or the woman that walks around humming all day long. I hate when the perfume wearers come to my desk or someone decides to burn a scented candle. I want to be a happy person but I’m constantly bombarded by sounds, smells and movements all day long. I become so stressed out and moody. I’m so thankful I’m in a cubicle and don’t directly see my coworkers. I just recently discovered my “problems” were actually disorders with medical names. I’m interested in why I have these disorders and are there cures. I was once sick with candida and was on a very strict diet years ago. I ate so clean for two weeks once. No sugar, no wheat, no diary. I didn’t notice a difference until I was at a birthday party. My Grandma sat across the table from me rubbing her cup and rocking back and forth. Things that would usually aggravate me until I left the room. This time was different. I was amazed that I was not bothered at all. It was almost as if I was floating in a warm bubble of water. All of my senses were sort of buffered. I just had a very comforting feeling and sounds and movements didn’t grate on my nerves. Then I was coaxed into eating cake and ice cream and by the next day I realized all of my “problems” were back in full force. I have not been able to recreate this “cure” again. I do wonder if diet plays a roll. Maybe inflammation? I don’t know but it would be nice to find out. Has anyone else experienced anything similar?

    Reply
  102. Salem

    I’ve had Misophonia since I was really little. Since then, I have also always had visual triggers. For me, it’s the sight of someone shaking their leg or feet that really gets me anxious.
    Finding out misophonia was a thing a couple years back really made me feel less crazy. Now, knowing there is such a thing as misokinesia as well, makes me feel even better.

    Reply
  103. Michelle O

    Today a co-worker handed me a piece of paper with the word ‘Misophonia’ and said look it up. I am in shock right now reading this article and comments. I had no clue that my heightened sensory (as my boyfriend describes it) to sounds and movements actually has a medical name and I wonder am I a candidate to be diagnosed with this. I have invested in really good noise cancelling headphones, so I can’t hear breathing at nighttime, I wear earplugs in the movie theatre after I have strategically pre-selected my seat and positioned myself hopefully away from eaters, breathers and of course movers and talkers. I have figured out how to use my long hair to cover up my fingers in my ears so I don’t have to hear a continuous noise. I have politely asked people to stop what they are doing as I can truly feel all kinds of emotions welling up inside of me, from frustration, anger and even to the point of crying because ‘I just can’t take it anymore’. I have left movie theatres, restaurants, events, friends and even meetings, because I can feel myself becoming so upset because of sounds and movements, and I don’t want to say something that I will regret because I can’t articulate what I am feeling well as the emotions inside become more and more heightened. If I hear someone chewing (especially gum, which my kids were banned from eating) it literally makes my skin crawl and a sensation goes up my spine that I can envision myself lashing out at the person, I found completely inconsiderate and rude making these noises, which I am mortified having these feelings. This has gotten worse over the years and I have concluded I do not have any form of autism but I do think the older I get (now 52) the worse it is getting. My tolerance level is very small these days  I don’t want to isolate myself but I feel at my most relaxed when I am, I don’t mind my company at all. I will keep following this article and see what is discovered and look for remedies to this horrible problem.

    Reply
  104. Tiffani

    I thank you for creating this site, Allergic to Sound!

    I’m 21 years old and I live with my mom and 3 siblings in a 3 bedroom apartment. And it’s becoming increasingly unbearable. I don’t have the resources to move out yet, hence I have NO choice but to endure this living hell. And my family members don’t seem to understand nor accept the facts that their habits makes me want to murder them in the worst way. And I resent myself for these thoughts. I also work with children.(the irony)

    Reply
  105. Mandy r

    Thanks for sharing this, I discovered misophonia was a condition when I was about 30 and have suffered with it for as long as i can remember. I remember my mum kicking me under the table at about 7 or 8 to stop me from glaring in disgust at the amount of noise my dad was making while eating. I still can’t relax or enjoy a family meal. It has always affected me more with whoever I’m closest to and so has affected every relationship and friendship I’ve ever had. The misokinesia is newer and affects me mostly with my husband who has a chronic sinus problem so struggles to breathe through his nose. The sound of him breathing through his mouth puts me in full anxiety mode..Sometimes
    When he’s leaning on his hand his finger will just migrate into his mouth, now as soon as his hand moves towards his face or touches his beard I’m completely on edge watching him like a hawk waiting for the noise of the mouth opening . then he’ll chew the dry skin on his fingers, the noise of that is a trigger so now as soon as he examines his hands for a nibble I’m glaring daggers at him. I’m working on meditation and regularly practice yoga but any ideas on treatments or approaches? Luckily he is the one person I have been able to talk to about this but it gives me such violent/ angry feelings I’ve always hidden it and developed a huge amount of self hate around it so I can’t even talk to him about it without apologetic floods of tears, it makes me feel like an awful person.
    If I could find a way of reducing my reaction so I’m not massively angry 80% of the time when I’m with the man i love I’d be ecstatic!

    Reply
  106. Julia Skinnarland

    Hello I am 13 years old and my name is Julia. Throughout my life so far I’ve never been able to explain why I felt like screaming or hyperventilating in some (rare) cases due to someone either fidgeting in the corner of my eye or eating. I remember when I was younger I would get so mad at my brother for making noises whilst he ate that I would have a massive go at him.. this then led me to realize not everyone felt this way because my family told me to stop acting rude and to let him eat or move to another room. Everytime someone ate or made annoying movements I learnt to just suck it up and not say anything whilst I screamed internally. After doing some research, I found this website about Misophonia and Misokinesia and I am almost certain I have both of these disorders but I don’t know if I’m just overreacting or not??? HELP PLEASE MY SISTER IS BITING HER NAILS ON THE SOFA OPPOSITE ME AND IM DYING IM NOT SURE IF THIS IS ALSO A SIGN??? can someone please put me out of my misery I need to know why no one else is like this

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Hi Julia, welcome to the site and please know that you are not alone! It can feel overwhelming and confusing reading about the disorder for the first time but it is real and you are not at fault. You can lead a very happy and fulfilling life with misophonia and I hope that as you learn more about it you’re able to develop coping techniques that help you.

      Reply
  107. Megan

    I can definitely relate to this! I sit across from someone at my school who is constantly tapping her feet, causing her whole body to move. It makes it so hard for me to concentrate in class that I have to turn my body and even close one of my eyes to get it out of my sight. I feel bad about it, but there’s nothing else to do.

    Reply
    • Julie M

      Ha, I do the same stuff on the subway, Megan. ESPECIALLY when someone nearby is playing with their hair!!! I feel so silly and obvious, but it’s not really within my control not to try and block the offending motion.

      Reply
  108. deojjde

    this is so relatable, im so glad i found this. i knew i suffered from misophonia since i was like 14 cus i was acting sooo weird when my dad drives and i knew it was not normal lmaoo, and im pretty sure i suffer from both conditions, my main triggers come from people who are close to me. its become so bad that i cant look at them when theyre talking, i have to look away from their face and body (i find it sooo gross and uncomfortable ughh) and sometimes if the noises get to intense ima be heading outa that place lmao like baii. also i wear headphones everywhere i go, music is like my best friend, im so isolated from my family because of this and i feel guilty about that at times. i eat alone and spend most of my time in my room and my parents think im spoilt because of this and i feel so bad. i tried telling my mum but she didnt understand cus most people have heard of the condition and she just told me to ignore it (like thats sooo helpful thanks mum lmao). i know i can cope with misophonia and misokinesia without making a big scene but i just come off as rude, antisocial and unfriendly to most people cus of it and i really wish it wasnt like that.

    Reply
  109. InsaneAsylum

    Oh my hat… I’m not alone! I am proper F’d. I have both Misophonia and Misokinesia. M-phonia worse than M-kinesia, just try watching a movie and your co-habitant has got that twitchy foot-toe thing going on. I remember having being placed away from my dad and brother at dinner at a young age so that I don’t flare up with their smacking noises when they eat. Had to adjust my view and turn my back on the couch to my brother to avoid his swinging F’ing foot all the time!! O god help me. People stare at me like I’m crazy when it triggers me, colleague coming to look at something on my screen whilst open mouthed chewing on gum. “I will fork out your eyes with a pencil and stab you in the throat!” – peace out =B *drops mic*

    Reply
  110. Ella

    I have suffered from this since I was little. I can’t remember when it first started, all I know is that I sit with my head exploding during school. If someone makes even the slightest movement with their foot or starts swinging or jiggling it, I can’t take it. It’s either put my hand up to cover my eyes, or sit there and silently suffer and not hear a word my teacher is saying. My parents say I need to learn “tolerence”. How can I tolerate something that my nerve system makes me want to jump off a cliff?????

    Reply
  111. Jennifer

    I suffer from both misophonia and misokinesia. Chewing is my sound aversion (particularly by my husband) and my very particular visual aversion is anyone playing with an inanimate object with their toes.

    Reply
  112. Autumn

    I’d love to share my whole life’s story about misophonia and misokinesia but I’ll try to keep it short. I’ve always known I had a serious case of misophonia but it wasn’t until recently that misokinesia really became a problem. I remember in college, a roommate I had used to twirl her hair constantly and I would purposely position myself so that I had my back to her most of the time. But recently I’ve noticed that some of the most ridiculous things absolutely sicken and enrage me and one of them is the way my husband holds the steering wheel of the car!! How stupid is that?! He separates his pinky from the rest of his hand and rest it below the steering wheel and for some reason I can’t STAND to look at it!! I physically get sick and angry and want to rip his pinky off! I try offering to drive most of the time so I don’t have to try avoiding the sight of that hand by staring out the passenger window or brushing my hair down far enough in my face that it blocks my peripheral view! I haven’t told him about this yet because he already thinks I’m crazy not letting him chew gum, click his computer mouse, pee with the door open, sniffle too many times without me insisting he blow his nose…the list goes on and on. I don’t see how he’s going to put up with me or I’m going to put up with the sounds and sights of living with another person for the rest of my life! I have struggled at school, church, work, home, social events…it’s never ending. I WANT A CURE!!

    Reply
    • Ann

      I feel your pain! I’m in the same boat with my husband, except he chews gum and walks around the house brushing his teeth (both sounds are triggers for me). The sight of gum chewing (movement of the mouth) also drives me absolutely nuts… so much that I have to look away. He will also watch TV and shake his foot nonstop. I sometimes will grab it and hold it still. Otherwise, I usually have to hold up my hand to block my view. I honestly need blinders. I just can’t deal with it. Some days, I honestly want to get a divorce because I am so annoyed and get so anxious. I want to gouge my eyes out and plug my ears. I need relief before I end up living alone due to this condition/disorder.

      Reply
  113. Tass

    Honestly, I have been brought to tears at people’s wiggling feet. I first noticed its uncontrollable effect on me sitting in high school classes, during the same day eating dinner in another room than my family due to my stepfather’s bites echoing in his mouth….

    Definitely have learned it’s my fault, which makes it easier.

    Recently it’s been more towards people saying that I just ‘think’ about it too much.

    Why the **** would I want to think about that?!

    Reply
  114. laura

    I almost feel like crying reading all of the posts on here. I have thought many times that I must be crazy and have been told by many people that the way I feel about certain sounds and movements is not normal. I know now that it might not be “normal” but it happens to other people. I know I have misophonia because the sound of people chewing drives me crazy. I also realized a long time ago that I have a hard time going to the movies and hearing people eat popcorn. If I sit next to someone and I can hear them breathing either because they are breathing through their nose or mouth and its making a sound it makes me want to pull my hair out. But Im pretty sure that my misokinesia is worse. If someone is constantly jiggling their leg, tapping a pencil, touching their hair or any small unnecessary repetitive motion that I can see, even out of the corner of me eye I just fill up with a sense of rage and anxiety. I know it isn’t rational. No one else even notices but it’s all I can focus on. I used to sit behind a girl in school and she would constantly reach her hands behind her hair and lift it up and run her fingers through it. I could not focus on anything else. I lost most of what the teacher was saying because I was so hyperfocused on those little movements. Is there any help for these things?

    Reply
  115. Kelli

    Thank god I found my people! In my search for “am I crazy” on the internet I always came across misophonia, but it never explained the full experience I have. My biggest trigger is nail biting, and of course my husband is a chronic nail biter. I’ll plug my ears but the motion out of the corner of my eye enrages me! I have to plug my ears AND put my hand to my temple to block my view of him, and I feel like a f*****g idiot doing this. Plus he thinks I’m being ridiculous (understandable, so do I). But when I don’t, I explode! And I’m the least angry person you’ll ever meet. But when there’s a trigger…. I turn into Mr. Hyde. I brought this up to my therapist and she had actually heard of it! Her response… basically there’s nothing I can do. Hilarious! My other triggers are people jiggling their leg (god help me), men sticking their hands down their pants (instant rage, not patriarchy-fueled I promise) and people rubbing their hands across their pants (literally makes the hair on my neck stand up and makes me feel sick, what the hell). When I was a teenager, my triggers where eating and breathing, so at least my triggers are becoming less common? ….

    Reply
    • Julie M

      Welcome aboard, Kelli. I can’t believe how many of us there are out there, and I am encouraged about the research that Tom has posted on this site. Thanks, Tom!

      Reply
      • Adnil

        I’m not mad then?! I remember as a child refusing to eat at the dinner table because my dad chomped when he ate. My ex husbands thumbs used to stick up off the steering wheel when driving and it drove me to distraction. My mum wrings her hands all the time and i cant bear to look at her, i have to stop her or sit in a position i cant see it. Chewing gum, drive me round the bend, both sound and site. I cant go into a restaurant if the acoustics are wrong as i cant stand the noise or i wear earplugs Ear plugs in later life have settle me. Wow i could go on and on but i wont. Hello fellow comrades. Lol

        Reply
  116. David

    I am about to file for divorce from my wife of 26 years over this. I am tired of the the frequent screaming, raging, and sarcasm from my wife and late teenage daughter whenever they hear a sound or see behavior encompassed by their misophonia or misokinesia. Other people in house are constantly walking on eggshells to avoid the blow-ups. And now, since this has been categorized as a disease, we all have to accommodate their suffering 24-7. I’ve had enough. So you’re irritated. Get over it or live alone and let the rest of us keep being human without you.

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Hi David. I’m so sorry to hear what you and your family have been going through. If you have a read through the articles on this site and the majority of the comments, I hope you’ll see that there’s another side to this and that people with this disorder are usually acutely aware of and upset by the pain and difficulty it causes for their loved ones. A couple of clarifications which I think are really important. Misophonia is a neurological disorder, not a disease. It’s not something you can catch, or affect, or put on. While I understand the frustration, wanting someone with misophonia to ‘get over it’ is a bit like asking someone with dyslexia to ‘get over it’. To give you an overly simplified explanation of the science behind this, when someone with misophonia/misokinesia hears or sees a trigger it involves amygdala in the brain. It’s a pre-conscious event – as in there is no choice involved. It releases hormones (against our will) and physically sets that person’s body off into freeze-fight-flight mode. Increased heart rate, cortisol (stress) hormones released etc. As far as the body is concerned it’s like someone jumping out at you with a knife every time you hear certain sounds – imagine what that’s like, 20, 30, 50 times a day. Now imagine what that’s like and compound it with the constant thought that your disorder is also hurting your loved ones. I’m so sorry to hear that there’s screaming and sarcasm – that’s really not fair on you and that must be a living hell. If you ever want to hit me up for information or anything on miso, please feel free to drop me a line, David. My contact form is at the bottom of the homepage.

      Reply
    • Melissa W.

      Dave.. I myself suffer from misophonia and I have to say.. I don’t blame you. I do not yell, or even tell my significant other to stop what they are doing, when I am angered. I walk away and leave the room. I understand that it is not his fault for making noises that is natural. Even though I may feel anger towards him while it’s happening and even though I think about leaving sometimes, because it just seems unbearable, I know it’s my problem and that he really is not doing anything wrong.. Although it would be nice for him to at least try, so I feel like I have his support, I do not demand it or hate him for noises he makes. Anyway.. I do not blame you for wanting a divorce. I would not be able handle people yelling at all day, for making everyday, normal noises, or being angry and feeling hate towards me, just for being human. I just don’t blame you. Now I’m sure some people here will disagree and say if you love her, you’ll stop, but they must realize, it’s hard to stop making noises that you most likely don’t even realize your making. Not only that.. misokinesis comes along with the misophonia alot of the time, which is hatred of movements, as opposed to sounds.. I mean, how can I tell someone to stop moving, stop breathing, stop chewing your food..ect. This is a really terrible disease to live with.. it really is. It feels like a struggle, all day, every day and it will just wear a person out. It’s awful to never be able to feel peace or relief. Now.. you being in the other shoe, I would imagine that you feel the same.. I’m sure your always on edge, just waiting for your wife and daughter to yell at all day, every day, for a noise you make and I’m sure you just want some peace and relief too.. It is a struggle for everyone. Anyway.. I understand where your coming from.. Best wishes..

      Reply
      • Bonnie

        Amen! Before I found out about misophonia & the related misokinesia, I thought my husband & other people were doing things on purpose to annoy me. When I found out that it was my problem, not theirs, I started dealing with it in a sane way. Sounds like your wife is using her misophonia as an excuse for her behavior. I’m sorry for you & don’t blame you a bit. Best of luck in the future.

        Reply
    • Priscilla

      David, I sympathise. I am 65 and am seriously going to get counselling to help me not explode when my daughter of 45 goes on about my shrieking voice, and I have benign tremor and arthritis both of which mean I move a bit when sitting. I get shouted at that I should learn to change. If I explain my medical conditions, it is me who should stop arguing back. I have read through screeds of comments today. And what I feel is the best advice comes from the poet Burns. Would that God the gift would give us to see ourselves as others see us. I think some sufferers should sit in a room together to see they are probably annoying other people just as much as they are being annoyed. I am considering never visiting my daughter again and not having her in my home. We can meet publicly where she won’t start on at me. Good luck in the future David.

      Reply
  117. Krystal

    My mother knew I had a disorder from just being an infant where everything would bother me and it became so awful starting at a young age around 2nd grade from my father breathing loudly and a whistle that came with it. I’m now in my 20’s and still dealing with this disorder and it seems to be getting worse! I can’t sleep at night from sounds even a fan doesn’t help because that’s making an noise that makes me super annoyed at night. I can’t be around people or my own family from irritations. Clocks, chewing, key boards, boyfriends xbox controller clicking from the buttons. etc all drive me crazy and I seriously live a depressed lonely life because of this issue. I wish I didn’t have to live with this anymore and I know there’s nothing I can do about it. Sometimes I wish people could understand how I feel instead of judging me for it.

    Reply
  118. Susie

    I can’t stand people fidgeting. Pulling at their lips constantly , pulling at facial hair , clicking , jingling change in their pockets , shaking legs or feet , kicking their show half off and shaking it around , clicking pens , whistling and loud bass are the worst for me. makes my whole body react. I feel like I am about to see red hahaha

    Reply
  119. Kerensa

    Misokinesia is a terrible sensitivity which causes great suffering. I think most people, including myself have it in various forms to one degree or another. Perhaps it’s a byproduct of the stressful society we live in today or an adverse side effect of our mothers taking the pill. I find prayer, faith in Jesus as my healer and listening to relaxing music very helpful. Also distracting the mind to think upon other things. There’s no problem too hard for God to solve and so I have faith that He will give me the strength to overcome and love others despite their annoying habits. The chances are that other people have annoying, repetitive habits because they are very lonely, fearful or anxious. And so I try and put myself in their shoes.

    Reply
  120. Abi

    I don’t feel so alone anymore. I started noticing I hated certain sounds when I was about 16- my father would eat potato chips and the sound of the foil packet and the crunch of the chip would make me extremely anxious and edgy.
    10 years later and its the same. My trigger sounds are sweets wrappers, lip smacking, crunching, the ‘ck’ sound in a word, tapping fingers…. it feels endless. Misokinesia is a lifesaver – I though I was just an ultra Bi*** when someone’s mouth moving when they chew or someone doing tiny repetitive movements made me feel like I would explode with annoyance.
    Its a struggle, and I don’t know why I don’t feel that way with my son of my husband as much as other people. My father recently came to live with us and I feel irritated with him 24/7 and so I try to avoid being around him because rationally I know its not his fault, but my brain wants to explode when he does things.
    I stay at home most of the time to avoid situations but its awful

    Reply
  121. Mambella

    I moved to the states two years ago and that’s when I noticed how annoyed I get at the sound of extractors in bathrooms, as they are so common here. Every time they’re on I can’t help but scream in agony and run to turn it off and make it stop. My dad calls me crazy. Also my dad, does something with his hands every time he is eating, and I can’t seem to bare the sight of it. He grabs whatever he has in his hands and before he takes it to his mouth he shakes it as to let down any kind of sauce (even if there is no sauce to shake off). I beg him to stop, but he can’t see the problem with it. When people do stuff like slurping their soup I feel like fainting, however, there I this guy at work who is always pulling his beard, but that doesn’t make me anxious. Going back to Misophonia, when I’m talking to my friend on the phone, oftentimes she is typing on her computer and the sound of it makes me hang up on her.

    Reply
  122. Liz

    Now that it seems like there are a lot of people suffering from this, I’m wondering about ways other people deal with it. Has anyone found some kind of relief in, I don’t know, medicine? Herbal tinctures? Some kind of therapy? I myself have experimented with passiflora, valerian, bach flower stuff, 5-HTP, L-tyrosin, alcohol benzo’s, none of which had any result. Also tried different kinds weed but I’m completely immune to it.

    Because seriously, this is by far the worst condition a human being can possibly have. For me anyways, the suffering is unbearable, I would honestly rather give birth to 10 quadruplets than living with this. Or swim the ocean with my limbs amputated, or burn alive, anything is better than having misokinesia.
    So how ridiculous is it that there is no known treatment for the most serious condition in the world?

    Reply
    • Melissa W.

      Now that there is much more awareness of misophonia and misokenisis, hopefully there will be a treatment soon. I agree that it’s unbearable. Every second of every day, I’m focused on movements and sounds around me. I’m so tired of being angry, irritable, disgusted and feeling full of hate ALL day long.. So much, that I have have prayed to become blind and/or deaf. It’s an awful way to live. The only things that I have found that help, is to leave the room and seclude myself from everyone. For misophonia, I have found that earplugs help mildly and I wear them all day long. I never take them out. My one ear is so sore, red and pussy, but I just keep pushing that ear plug in every day and deal with pain, as I would rather be in pain and have an infection, then to hear someone breathing, eating, ect. I have even thought about suicide, to make it stop. I just want it to stop so badly, but it never ends.. Every second of every day, I’m suffering, so I feel your pain. I pray there is a successful treatment soon..

      Reply
      • Rebecca Cramer

        My doctor recommended cognitive behavioral therapy but I have no idea how it will work because she didn’t seem to understand I only told my mom there was a condition this year around the time my sister was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease so she thinks it’s related to that has anyone else tried this

        Reply
  123. Claire

    Almost once a day, I wish it was acceptable for people to wear blinders. It would make my life so much easier if I didn’t have see people bobbing their legs around out of the corner of my eye !

    Reply
  124. Ann

    This is 100% me. I am currently sitting on a ferry Abenaki my husband immediately put some ginger gum in his mouth. It drives me into a panicked state to see him chewing the gum nonstop. I want to gouge my eyes out. Thankfully, I cannot hear the chewing because that is even worse. Then I have to cover my ears or put in earplugs. I go over the edge and then he gets mad at me when I simply am covering my ears so I don’t have an anxiety attack and start crying.

    I also struggle when he is watching TV and shakes his foot incessantly. I have to put my hands up as blinders because it causes so much anxiety in me. I honestly want to grab his foot and hold it still.

    Sounds and constant movements all bother me. Tooth brushing and flossing sounds are horrible triggers for me too. I usually end up humming or singing out loud to try to mask the sound. I just cannot deal.

    This is such a frustrating condition. I wish I were “normal” (whatever that is) or at least free of these conditions/quirks. Anxiety is bad enough when it sneaks up at random, but to have so many daily things cause more can be a real struggle. It makes certain life activities no fun. Sometimes I think I would be better off not being married because I am on edge so much. I honestly need something to relax my brain from going crazy of sounds and movements. What can I do?

    Reply
    • Ann

      Oops… *AND my husband immediately put gum in his mouth.* not sure what happened with autocorrect.

      Reply
  125. L Blencowe

    Kindly add me to your emailing list
    Thanks

    Reply
  126. Wendy Gilmore

    I have had misophonia since I was 10 or 11 and I’m now 64. I believe I also have misokinesia because I can stand repetitive movements, specifically when someone crosses their legs and moves the top one up and down, or jiggles their feets. Also repetitive hand movements give rise to the anxiety. I basically have to shield my view of it as in most situations it would be impolite to ask the person to stop. If I ask my husband to please stop he usually gets angry with me and tells me “everything bothers me”. When I perceive repetitive movements, it’s like I can’t focus on anything else. Even if they are just in my peripheral vision that’s all I see.

    Reply
  127. Kacey

    I had never of this until I read about Kelly Ripa and sounds that bothered her. Started when I was young and the older I got I just figured it was just me, that I was overly sensitive and it would pass. Seems the opposite. Whistling and humming bother me. Rubbing feet together, with or without socks as well. Both sight and sound on the feet rubbing. My partner recently started singing and it hurts my ears. She admits she can’t sing, but its something about her tone that makes me kinda hope she gets strep throat. I know that’s mean but it’s how I feel and she knows its bothers me, just not the extent.i don’t know what to do.

    Reply
  128. Linda

    Wow, nice to know I’m not going crazy. Sounds I struggle with are “electric guitar” that sliding sound Jimi Hendrix used to play. Hubby sleeps facing me, inhales through his nose and blows it out through his closed mouth causing “pop”, it blows my bangs up!! I put a pillow between us. Blender, coffee grinder and vacuum cleaner dive me nuts. People who sneeze or cough with their loud voice! Ouch, that hurts my ears. Fingers tapping repetitive sounds on the table for no reason except to make noise. Back ground music, I can’t focus on who’s speaking with it blaring or even playing softly. Toys, police car, fire truck etc… Now that I read this, I even look weird to me!!! Yesterday my three years old Granddaughter didn’t want a smoothie because she hates the blender sound. Ooooops! Just like Grandma.

    Reply
  129. Julie M

    Gads, Linda the “pop”! I have that too, with my partner. It’s torture! I’ve had to learn how to sleep with my fingers clamping my ears, and because of that my hands are constantly cramped.

    Reply
    • Linda

      Thanks for your Input Julie, makes me feel less alone in this learning journey. Nice to hear how others manage.

      Reply
  130. Julie M

    No, indeed, we are not alone! It’s astounding how many of us there are. Soon I hope there will be enough research to maybe find a way to relieve our brains from the constant barrage.

    Reply
  131. Al MacDonald

    I suffer from both misophonia and misokinesia. All the sounds mentioned above are on my list. My wife has a habit if twirling her thumbs in the passenger seat of the car. I have to find a way to block my peripheral view, to avoid going nuts. The best way I can describe it to a non-sufferer is that these sights and sounds are invasive.

    Reply
  132. Natalie

    I’m 19 years old now, and I’ve been suffering with this since I was in 5th grade. There’s no doubt that I have Misophonia and misokinesia. Some of my trigger sounds are: typing, chewing, coughing, clearing throat, sniffing, overly-pronounced and clearly-pronounced letter sounds such as “k, p, b, d, s, ch” and so on.. Also hearing certain people speak (my mom and sisters), and hearing TVs mumbling and hearing muffling voices but only hearing the “s’s” pronounced. Dogs licking themselves, any animal licking themselves, mouth sounds (especially when I’m in a quiet room or classroom, I hear EVERYTHING going on around me). I’ve had to bring earplugs with me to most of the places I go just so I can feel relaxed in knowing that I can use them if I get desperate. I usually have to mimic/copy these sounds to make the sound get out of my head and make me feel better.
    Some visual motions that trigger me big-time:
    fingers, hands, legs, feet moving, seeing things out of the corner of my eye moving, even just a slight bit. SEEING someone chewing, I can’t usually drive with people in the passenger seat of the car unless they hold their hands in 1 single position and don’t move them. Also when someone’s on their phone around me and I can see their thumb scrolling and fingers typing.
    I also have visual triggers of things that don’t move.I hate seeing my sister’s hand positioned in a certain way. I hate seeing small clusters of things together. If I’m trying to focus on something in front of me, if there’s an object that catches my eye, it can be a trigger. If I see things that trigger me, I have to rub my eyes super hard to get the image out of my brain. Sometimes I look at the sun to make myself see those bright spots to get the image out of my head.
    These are only SOME of the things I suffer with every single day. I’ve always had special accommodations at school because of this, and I’m diagnosed with OCD and anxiety. I don’t know how to help myself. This “disorder” needs to become an actual disorder soon. There needs to be more studies on Misophonia and Misokinesia. This “disorder” has affected my life very negatively. Anyone else?

    Reply
    • Sunny

      Hi Natalie, you are definitely not alone, there are thousands of people suffering from these disorders…take heart and fight it out…God bless..

      Reply
    • Stress girl

      Me too, i need to mimic the sound or gesture back, if not i feel very angry. This semester i got a roommate who ate and drank so loudly. She produce the wet click tongue mouth sound. It really annoying. Everytime she sip her drink she would make that click sound. So, i mimic her but now i scared as if she know that i mimic her and she make the sound much loud than usual. She also produce annoying sound from leg rubbing. She rub her leg in every 1 minute.

      Reply
  133. Christina

    I have both. It started around age 6 with my mom’s ice chewing and coffee sipping. It has snowballed into basically any sound food or drink related including its wrappers, dinnerware, etc, plus sniffing, yawning, coughing, etc. and then theres the way my mom’s lips purse before the cup touches her lips or the way my dad chews his food with his front teeth so his jaw just goes up and down super fast over and over and then if he talks within several minutes of swallowing I can tell he’s had food in his mouth recently. Then there’s the way my sister has to say ah after every sip of drink. WHY???? Just drink it! Then there’s the rustling of the candy wrapper in the pocket of the Bible school teacher. Either take it out or don’t but stop touching it! Then there’s the people who have to shake their ice in the cup each time they pick it up like it’s gonna make it colder. It’s not. Then there’s the way my mom tries to hide the fact that she has gum in her mouth. I already saw your mouth move. Why did you have to eat it to begin with? Seriously. It’s a living hell trying to live like this. It’s like being on constant lookout for land mines. And then add narcolepsy on top of it so I’m constantly tired and irritated. Living hell people.

    Reply
  134. Sarah

    I suffer greatly from both misophonia and misokenesia. My ears hurt from daily life, I have intense headaches feon trying so hard to cope with the frustrations of going anywhere to get anything done. I am married, I have 3 children, a dog, a cat, live quietly but life in general is not enjoyable to me. I hate sound, and when you mix the visual trigger with the sound it is unbearable. Like a morbidly obese oerson eating like a pig with an open mouth, and slurping food, it is disgusting to me. Soeple scooti g their feet on the floor, I dont even have to hear it to be irritated by it, just seeing it! Restaurants suck,stores suck, outdoor festivals suck, where people gather sucks. I have hated myself for a long time for feeling so mad and angry inside, even tried to take my own life a few years ago. I am not in the same place I once was, but rather learned to suffer rather than voice my frustrations about everything, gum chewers, cellphone wraplera, songs with annoying instruments, nasally voices, snot sniffling, loud sneezes, smelly people, loud talkers and laughers, attention seekers, leg shakers, finger tappers, when I see wo.an use a stupud finger to hide their stupid mouths as they eat, it enrages me to no end, WHY PEOPLE WHY!?!?! Just eat your damn food,keep yoir ugly finger down and away from your face. See, others may be judging me now from my comments but I manage to fight through each day. I feel everyones pain here.

    Reply
  135. Hannnah

    My grandad likes to flick his slipper up and down balanced on his toes and if I’m angled towards him enough that I can see that, then I can’t bear to be in the same room for more than two minutes. I also find that I have a connection between misophonia and misokinesia because both he and my nan like to slide their dry hand over their other hand and it makes a dull shuffle sound that makes seeing it repeatedly twice as bad.

    Reply
  136. Dolly

    Hello. I am quite tearful now. I am relieved I am not a monster. I tried watching a film with my husband and he wouldn’t stop touching his chin.He recognised I was agitated and is now shouting and ranting that I need help. I reckon I do. But where from. I have been tortured all my life with tolerating people’s picking, touching .moving. Just natural things folk do. But to me it’s such a challenge.

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Hi Dolly. You’re strong and you can do this. Yes you have a neurological disorder but this doesn’t make you weird, or bad or wrong it just makes you different – and means you have different needs.

      If you type in ‘coping mechanisms’ in the search box of this site you’ll find all of our articles on techniques you can use to help you get by in the moment. For your husband’s part if he can read up about misokinesia and misophonia and learn about how this disorder operates he will be helping you and himself immensely. The greatest arguments and upsets and pain around our disorder come through misunderstanding.

      People with misophonia can’t be trained or conditioned out of it – it’s something that occurs pre-conciously in the amygdala – it’s not a choice or a decision, but it is definitely something that we can still live very happy and successful and fulfilled lives with.

      Reply
  137. Eleanor

    Oh my god. I am sitting here CRYING with laughter…. and relief. There are other people like me!! Hahaha. My triggers are people randomly opening their mouth while eating, and people talking with a croaky voice (I just wanna yell at them to clear their throat). My poor husband gets the brunt of it tho. His beard rubbing and twisting, his feet tapping, his feet rubbing together, eating toast (omg I nearly left the house tonight), the sound of his mouth when we’re kissing passionately !!!!! I try so hard not to lose it and I try so hard to just grit my teeth and bear it, but it’s so hard. Feel like I’m gonna explode some days. I’m going to read all your coping mechanisms on this site!! Thank you. and thank you for the belly laughs lol arrrrgh he’s snoring gently right now. Quite seriously, I love him so much and hate that I feel this way 🙁

    Reply
  138. Lily

    What I don’t get is people saying that pulling on your beard over and over, or repetitively popping a ring in and out of your mouth for two hours, are completely “normal” behaviours, but having an intolerance for them is “abnormal”. My husband is a non-stop fidgeter, and I have both misophonia and misokinesia. When I first told him his fidgeting was making me nauseated and upset, he couldn’t comprehend how it was possible. However, he soon realised I wasn’t kidding, and he has made a concerted effort to fidget less. He understands I’m not “mental”, and he also asserts that misophonia and misokinesia are no more abnormal than his constant need to move and fiddle with everything.

    Reply
  139. Stephen Lane

    I can’t stand the sound of whistling. I’m in University so it’s a daily challenge, as there’s an inescapable inevitability that someone somewhere is going to be cheerfully whistling with great abandon. Last semster doing a 2 hour lab, a studnt a fw rows away was doing this, for the whole 120 mins. I managed to silently endure the lab, but ended up having a mini nervous breakdown, that required 3 months of counselling. I felt so much bottled up rage and anxiety leaving the lab that I bit my left hand so hard it bled. With regards to Misokinesia, I hate the way people who read books or papers, put their index finger on the inside of the page. It drives me crazy. Why would you not just hold the page from the outside? I think I will take up more counseling this semester, cognitive behavioral therapy, as it does help to an extent. The real life savers are Headphones and Silicone Earplugs. I don’t have much faith in there being a cure, as the illness is about 1% researched.

    Reply
  140. Pamela

    I remember feeling the rage when I was probably in my teens. My dad was eating a banana with his mouth open smacking his lips. Repetitive movement I can see peripherally and vibrations that cannot be explained keep me from flying to destinations. Last night my husband saw me reacting to him with a bag of chips and yelled at me. I can’t watch people in restaurants chewing even though I can’t hear them. When my husband gets a cold and clears his throat repetitively- OMG. Reporters or newscasters that say “um” – is all I can hear when I recognize the pattern. I may have to download your book. I am going to use this info for my husband. My son who passed 7 years ago shared this malady with me.

    Reply
  141. Joyce

    Oh my gosh I am so glad ifound this page I’m crying my family thinks I’m crazy because of noises and certain movements drive me crazy I can’t stand repetative tapping Ioud lip smacking or chewing. Loud TVs or loud repetative sounds also leg shaking But I don’t know what to do about it how do you cope I have a Feeling the dr would think I was crazy

    Reply
  142. Ruth Christie

    Thank you for putting a name to my pain. I have been driven mad by eating noises, crisp packets, slurping, kissy sounds on telly etc for as long as I can remember. I am really irritated and driven quite mad by movement in my peripheral vision when I need stillness, for example, watching telly, reading, working on the computer. It only affects me when I am sitting or laying down. I get the noise association with this kind of movement. I can only cope with the internal sound of my own eating because the movement matches the sound.

    Reply
  143. Francine Abell

    It is painful for me, as a Grandmother, to see this illness in my granddaughter. She will be nine at the end of August and started suffering with this at around 4 years of age. I’ve also observed IED (Intermittent Explosive Disorder) and found a blog from Australia tying these two disorders together. Since I do not observe her extreme reactions in older people, I am hoping that either aging diminishes it or at least self awareness helps control it. I have read that not much is known about this disorder other than anxiety can play a part in cause/effect. I don’t think it has been truly recognized by the psychiatric community. My own suspicion concerning the onset in my Granddaughter, may be from a alcoholic father at time of conception. Perhaps that known deleterious peridiction affects her genetic makeup? She is short of stature for her age and has some same facial development I’ve seen on Prenatal Alcoholism pictures on line. My granddaughter is extremely bright, so I wonder if these heightened senses cross into that area of the brain as well. The saying “she doesn’t miss a trick” literally applies to her observance of anything. Her comments on everything are beyond her years. I want my daughter to get in touch with NIMH which is close to us here in Bethesda, MD. I know it won’t be long before female hormones will affect her both physically and mentally. I worry what those changes mean for this disorder.

    Reply
  144. Joan Dabrowski

    What??? I’m not just an uptight %&*#@!!! It feels so freeing to know I am not just a big jerk. My entire life I have struggled with anxiety over my brother squeezing his zits in front of me, people clipping their nails, cleaning their ears (in church!), drumming their fingers on the table, opening a bag of chips, loud sneezing….I thought I was just a control freak but only in certain areas. I’m pretty laid back about everything else in life 😀 THANK YOU so much for having this site!!!

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      You’re super welcome Joan! (And no, you’re not an uptight %&*#@!)

      Reply
      • Kelsie

        I recently just found d out that other people suffered from this! I dont feel like such a freak! These conditions have greatly affected my marriage and friendships. My husband is afraid to eat in front of me because I shoot him eye daggers, and sometimes yell at him! When we are lounging I. The house watching TV I have to position my hands to block him out of my view because he wiggles his feet a lot. All the way back to how my mom held the steering wheel when I was a kid I remember I hated her hands and would have to put my hair all the way to one side so I couldn’t see them. I never knew this was a thing I just thought I was impatient ,irritated, or just weird. Good to know I’m not alone!

        Reply
  145. Chad

    For years I knew about this thing called Misophonia and realized I had these triggers even as a young kid. It was such a great feeling knowing there was an actual name for this illness and that I wasn’t alone. For the longest time I noticed that I had the same anxiety that comes with Misophonia (auditory triggers) as I do with certain visual triggers. Talk about a double whammy. I had no idea what it could be until about a month ago I searched “Misophonia with visual triggers” and found this site. WOW! How incredible it feels to know this Misokinesia is also a very real thing and again, I’m not alone. Living with these both (to the extreme) is not something I would wish upon my worst enemy. It sucks…big time! Auditory triggers include anything from repetitive tapping, loud chewing, clicks of a clock, water drops from a faucet, whistling, knuckle cracking, loud nasal or mouth breathing, people shuffling their feet when walking (especially with flip flops)…the list goes on. Visual triggers include everything from people holding their finger to their lips or face, nodding too often, chewing with an open mouth, people fanning themselves with a piece of paper, people talking towards you but with their eyes closed (obscure, I know), and much, much more. At my old job a co-worker who sat beside me would sometimes click on a window on their screen and move it around all over the computer screen (when waiting for a large file to save, for example) and that would drive me so nuts I had to move to a different desk. The simplest way I can explain this feeling is that anything repetitive and “not still” will usually drive me up the wall. It’s the suckiest thing to deal with and even worse trying to explain it to people who don’t suffer with it. As far as treatments go, I haven’t heard any sort of therapy which helps. Can anyone shed some insight of ways they’ve been able to “overcome” this? So far the only thing I’ve noticed to help is to remove myself from environments where these triggers most commonly happen. I started taking CBD oils for anxiety but I noticed that really just helps with social anxiety and has no affect on Misophonia or Misokinesia.

    Any feedback is greatly appreciated.

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Hi Chad, thanks for your comment. Fascinated to hear what others have to say on this. I’ve personally not come across any medication or therapy that helps much with the misokinesia thus far – only the act of applying blinkers. By that I mean placing things in the way of triggers at work (for example a plant to my left and strategically placed books and stationary to my front). This works. I also place my hand on the side of my face in tricky situations when out and about (as if I’m resting my head but artfully covering the eye that’s seen triggers).

      Reply
  146. Kathy Thompson

    Oh, my, yes, yes, yes! My husband just wet his fingers to turn pages, and I wanted to scream. When he fidgets with his hands, I want to lash out. I’m glad that it’s not just me, but I hate being this way.

    Reply
  147. Erica Scafe

    OMG. Someone mentioned misokinesia so I popped onto google for a definition… and my mind is blown. Several years ago I learned about misophonia, and was so happy to know I wasn’t just “nutty” as my husband calls my reaction to repetitive sounds. But I definitely react to repetitive motion as well. I always assumed that I was imagining the very quiet sound it was making and that’s what was agitating me, even though I couldn’t hear the sound. Does that make sense? But to read your movie theater story… my husband absentmindedly rubs the stubble on his jawline during movies. I’ve tried to explain to him it’s like I can’t even see or hear the movie, I can only focus on his chin rubbing. Luckily over the years he’s pretty good about stopping the movements or noises when I point them out to him, or usually just a certain look from me will do it. But I know he still thinks I’m a little crazy because he just can’t imagine how a little thing can make me so mad. Thanks for adding this to my understanding!

    Reply
  148. JoJo

    I have Misophonia and I’m now in my mid sixties and have always thought I was bit insane until I learnt about it about 4 years ago.
    I believe I also suffer from Misokinesia as I find movements such as jiggling a foot, playing with a pen (or other article) to be very aggravating. Dealing with family who are always picking at their face, or juggling their dentures in their mouth, or constantly squishing an empty water bottle enrage me greatly as both sensors are on high alert!
    I just wish to God that there was a ‘cure’ for it – perhaps there will be, but I doubt it will be in my lifetime.

    Reply
  149. Christina

    I have had misophonia since around age 7 and it progressed to what I would call severe in the last several years. I’m now 43 and it has made my relationships with my immediate family very strained and tense, especially with my dad who makes all kinds of noises inside his mouth and throat when eating or drinking of course but even when he’s just talking. He also constantly blows his nose. My mom and sister are both sniffers. I could go on and on but what I want to say is I recently started on 2 meds which have dramatically improved the rage and even helped with even noticing things I would’ve alerted on from 2 rooms away. Lexapro and Risperdal. I think it’s mainly the Risperdal that’s helping though. Lexapro is an antidepressant with calming and anxiolytic properties and Risperdal is an antipsychotic that is usually used as a mood stabilizer. I know that one sounds scary but it totally takes off that edge that makes you feel like you are constantly on watch for the next sound or movement so you can bolt from the room as soon as possible. I know I have been on the search for the “cure” for many years and tried different antidepressants and anxiolytics only to be disappointed, so for me this find is as close to a cure as I think I’m going to get and I’m so grateful for it.

    Reply
  150. Alisa

    Omg
    I never knew that other people have the same issues
    I hate most of the sounds people make including talking. I can’t stand some voices. If the person talks to me and I find his voice annoying then it’s a pure torture
    I avoid family dinner bcz I don’t enjoy food when someone is chewing. I can eat with people in a restaurant bcz there is alway some music and other people talking and that makes chewing sound get lost in the background noise.
    I can only sleep by myself bcz persons breathing, moving sounds disturb me a lot. Snoring is unbearable for me. I get super angry.
    And I also hate some body postures. Can’t stand when people put their hands on the belt area. Or do some movements like keep on touching their nose, hair, lips, ears. Just hate it
    I get put off by people who do that in front of me. Want to run away from them even if they are nicest people. In fact my marriage is ruined bcz my husband started snoring and I started hating him. And I can’t control it. It’s so difficult to live a normal life 🙁

    Reply
    • Debra M.

      Alisa,
      I could have written this myself. I am exactly the same and have been.
      I can remember at a very young age my fathers loud snoring making me angry.
      I’m on my my third marriage now but luckily we both prefer to sleep in separate rooms, only because we get better sleep that way.
      You are not alone.

      Reply
  151. Sunny

    These days its getting worse as i started hating to hear the sound of a simple laptop keyboard. Uhhhh…The mouse clicks…such a pain to bear…got to plugin those ear buds forcibly almost all the time when working…that’s the only way to escape from this torture….

    Reply
  152. Melanie

    I’ve known I had this for decades, and feel like I am going crazy waiting for the medical community to catch up with me. It started with hearing people mumbling through headphones at about age 12 – I need to have 100% quiet. If I can tell you’re talking, it’s as bad as if I can actually hear you 100%. I used to scream at my much younger sister, whose tongue, as they say, runs on wheels, when I was stuck on car trips with her blabbing nonstop, I got termed the family “monster”, etc., in turn for this, and have next to no relationship with my family because of it. I’ve always known that the leg-shaking bothered me, but to some extent, things have only gotten worse with age, and I have piled up more and more triggers. Whining computer printers… foreign languages that sound like whining or barking to me (makes no nevermind to me that I can’t understand what they’re saying)… dogs that whine and bark for hours at a time… people shoveling snot up their nose instead of blowing it… things glugging into glasses, spoons scraping across china or across the yogurt containers like they’re digging for gold… doors and ramps of trucks slamming… some of it may be OCD-related, but I’ve had the full battery of psych tests twice, and every time it’s happened, it’s been the same result, “you don’t have OCD or ADHD… you’re a little depressed and a little anxious.” Me: “YES, I’m depressed and anxious – BECAUSE of being constantly triggered!” Modern offices are The. Worst. I’ve always hated them, and it’s gotten worse with age. I’m also always stuck next to the loudest areas on the face of the planet. “Hey, yeah, for some unfathomable reason, this one strikes us like a placid cow! Let’s seat her next to the front door, staircase leading to the upper floor, kitchen, mailroom, and hallway leading to bathroom and three other departments! She’ll thrive there!” When I complain, I am of course the b!tch asking for the world… Nobody seems to care that I’m the first person they’d want around if the office caught on fire or similar because I’d be on that like white on rice; they just want me to shut up and pretend that nothing triggers me. I sit next to some of the most annoying people on the planet; and my misophonia currently encompasses anyone moving around me anywhere in my office within the ambit of my peripheral vision. I join the brigades of people who have thought being deaf and blind would be preferable to living like this. I have to work; and then work drains me to the point where I want to do nothing else after it; so I don’t have time for a “side hustle” or anything else. I’ve never not worked in one of those insane open offices with cubicle walls lower than your breastbone which block out nothing; so when people tell me to go look for a job in another field, I’m like, “Where? I can’t afford the time it would take to find a job in a place where they believe in quiet private offices for someone at my level. It would take months, maybe years. I’ve never even been lucky enough to find a place that believes in head-high cubicle walls.” I wait and hope every single day that miso is recognized as an official health condition, because there’s no way I can spend decades more of my life like this.

    Reply
    • Madison Gracey

      I relate so much to this post, and I feel the same way. I’m only 19 but I’ve had triggers since I can remember and they too have only been multiplying.

      Reply
  153. Madelyn

    I wonder if anyone is suffering from any additional physical conditions or symptoms due to our misokinesia? I would think that, if the body suffers such an extreme amount of “trigger responses” it also affects the heart, blood pressure, kidneys, maybe other organs. Every day people die from conditions that were worsened by too much stress in their lives. And the “stress” we have to go through with this condition is actually much worse, because our bodies make up like hundreds of more trigger responses. I don’t know if I’m making any sense here, I’m just so surprised sometimes that none of us have dropped dead yet.

    Reply
    • chad

      Hey Madelyn,

      I’ve actually been experiencing a shortness of breath the past couple weeks (most likely due to stress and anxiety)…part of this is due to my busy work schedule lately but I am positive that the anxiety from misophonia and misokinesia over the years has not done much to help my mental and physical state. I’ve been reading up on anxiety and shortness of breath and high blood pressure and there’s definitely a connection there. I’m curious also if anyone else has experienced similar symptoms because of misophonia and misokinesia. I’m working from home today just to see if my breathing gets any better because I’m not around the hundreds of triggers I get at work, but it’s scary when this is causing shortness of breath.

      Reply
      • Christina

        Interesting. I’ve had hbp since 35 but I daily have shortness of breath. I’m thin and I’m not horrible shape so there’s no reason really for the shortness of breath. It’s the worst if I bend over like to tie shoes or clean the floor or something. It’s embarrassing.

        Reply
  154. Misha

    Iv got Misophonia and Misokinesia I didn’t know what it was at first I was told I was just overreacting or being rude but I was happy to discover it’s actually a thing my whole family knows about it but just dont get it they think I’m just tryna be rude. One of my triggers is my sister singing I can stand anyone else but just not her how would it be best to explain it? She’s only 11 btw I’m planing on showing her some articles about it but I think their to complicated for her so she might still not understand.

    Reply
  155. Madison Gracey

    I suffer bad! The biggest things for me are watching people chew gum, I’ve had experiences on the bus where I’ve had to close my eyes because I could see someone chewing in every direction. As well, leg bouncing drives me absolutely crazy. When I get triggered by either sound or movement, I feel super angry, like I’ll say in my head “f@#$ this person” even though I know how super irrational it is! The worst part is when I tell friends what I go through, they call me crazy.

    Reply
  156. Shaeleigh

    I have noticed that things like people shaking their legs when they sit, when people are moving their jaw while eating (even though they are silent) have really started to get under my skin. In fact, there’s 3 kids in-front of me who are shaking their leg and it’s all I think about. Whenever I move my computer to block one foot, the other one starts to shake and so on.

    I find this one worse then misophonia. The reason being is that I can’t simply close my eyes and ignore it, because I have work to do. I can’t read with my eyes closed, I can’t write with my eyes closed. Whereas with misophonia, I can put music on which makes the noises go away.

    Sorry in advance for any mistakes in my writing. I have a hard time with writing and if you wanted to help me correct any mistakes, I made I would greatly appreciate it. 🙂

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      You’re writing is great Shaeleigh!

      I can totally identify with misokinesia sometimes feeling harder to cope with than misophonia. As you say you can’t just close your eyes and still read and write so unless you’ve got your own cubicle/office/hermit’s cave it’s very hard to get any respite.

      Reply
      • Melanie

        Sometimes I have been known to scroll around applications at work with my eyes closed, lol. Unfortunately I can’t get away with it for less than a minute at the time, because I don’t want to get marked down for “falling asleep” at work, especially if I’m not even napping. I dream daily at work of advances in technology that allow me to block these things out without anyone knowing I’m blocking them out – headphones entirely transparent like crayfish (wires, everything); invisible barriers that block me from everyone’s view but simultaneously let ME monitor THEM; etc.

        I also can’t help but think there’s something psychologically interesting about the fact that it technically literally makes me feel better, as long as my eyes are closed and I can’t tell if people are looking at me. It has to be something esoteric involving brain wiring IMO; because I’m clearly old enough to have moved past the “because I can’t see them, that means they can’t see me” developmental stage.

        Reply
  157. JD

    I’ve had misophonia for as long as I can remember it’s really bad I don’t even like eating with people it makes me so angry but my mother and grandmother were same way so had very good eating habits growing up however most people don’t I can’t stand smacking, gum, or talking with food and all the noises that tag along. Over the last few years Misokinesia has been real bad for me as well although I didn’t know what it was my wife and parents constantly shake their foot and it’s annoying as all get out along with any constant shaking rubbing leg or hair it makes me nervous and angry. I try really hard to tell myself how silly it is but not much seems to help sometimes I have to walk away or face other direction during conversation so I don’t blow up. Anything help anyone?

    Reply
  158. Nan

    I nearly cried from relief to stumble upon this website. I knew I had misophonia, since an early age, and worsening over time..but I am just now understanding that I also have misokinesia. My son and I are sensory antonyms.
    I have misophonia. And he has sensory-seeking related to vestibular issues. Therefore, he is soothed, helped, and focused by repetitive noise and actions; his most favorite being dropping a coin over and over on our marble counter top. Sometimes, he’ll stop if I ask. It’s when we need to be in the same room (e.g., I’m cooking dinner and he’s on the computer in the kitchen) and the noise gets to me before I can catch it, and instantly it’s rage. I would love suggestions for when separating from the noise, nor checking/tuning out is not an option. TIA And I’m open to being in research!!

    Reply
    • Allergic to Sound

      Oh gosh that must be so tricky! It sounds like you are a wonderfully supportive mother and are actively finding ways to make it work for you both despite the challenges! Will definitely let you know in the email newsletter/website if any new devices or coping mechanisms arise and of course about any research – thank you!

      Reply
      • Nan

        Thank you!! I so appreciate the support.

        Reply
  159. Chad Palmer

    Hey all,

    So I know this isn’t a cure or anything, but one thing I’ve noticed helping with general anxiety is CBD…it’s been making a huge impact in my life. Of course, it doesn’t magically block out the auditory triggers of misophonia or the visual triggers of misokinesia (I still need to adjust my position so the visual triggers are out of view or always have earbuds handy so I can put on some music to drown out the auditory triggers), but I have noticed a slight improvement in how quickly I react to the triggers after using CBD. I have been using the gummies, oils, and vape pen everyday and I can see a pretty good improvement in overall mental health.

    I’m curious if anyone else has used this to help calm them down too…and perhaps this can be a tiny step for us suffering in not getting so angered by the triggers right away.

    Chad

    Reply
    • Madelyn

      I haven’t tried it yet but it sounds interesting, thanks for the tip!
      Isn’t it really expensive though?

      Reply
      • Chad Palmer

        Hey Madelyn,

        I have found some CBD products that are quite reasonable pricing. Just gotta do a little research online, and also I’ve noticed smoke shops are starting to carry CBD vape pens and gummies. But overall it’s not very expensive. [:

        Reply
  160. Alistair

    Hi. I came across this as I had just annoyed my wife by my reaction to her slurping her hot drink. Whistling, tapping, chewing, popping of chewing gum, tutting/lip smacking(only for last 4 years) all make me feel angry inside. As do ring fidgetting, playing with hair(oh the noise of finger nails on scalp), foot jiggling, rubbing of face etc.
    I use avoidance by using a part of my body to block out visual triggers, or leave the room. Worse thing is I mimic the noise in the case of tutting and of course this can get noticed to the annoyance of the other person.
    I really didn’t know there was a name/disorder but have toyed with going to my GP. I shall now take that step.
    It isn’t just being irritated, it is that feeling of anger, of wanting to do something irrational or worse.
    Thanks

    Reply
  161. Madelyn

    Hello fellow-sufferers. So for a while now I’ve been trying several kinds of supplements to see if I can find any kind of relief. I know that sounds stupid but since there is no medication I don’t know what else to do. Some people say ‘Oh just have some wine and you’ll be chill and not notice it anymore’. Yeah right. I don’t know about you people, but alcohol doesn’t work that way for me. So the latest thing I’ve tried was L-tyrosine, which is basically just a suppplement also found in foods like meat, diary and nuts. It should however not be taken together with anti-depressants because it’s also a precursor to neurotransmitters like dopamine and noradrenaline. So i thought I’d give it a go. I noticed my trigger-reaction is a litte more bearable. Just A LITTLE so don’t get your hopes up 😉 but I just thought I’d share it here since there are no doctors to help us.

    Reply
    • Melissa W.

      That’s great that it’s helping you a bit, just be careful though, as rasing dopamine too much will lower your serotonin levels and that can lead to depression. Perhaps taking a supplement that will keep your serotonin up will be a good add on. I know 5htp will help serotonin..

      Reply
  162. Jon

    I cannot stand birds and their noises. Especially the mockingbird which makes every noise of every bird out there. I can’t stand it when people bite their nails suck their thumb or scratch on themselves for long periods of time. I absolutely lose it in my mind when people smack their food because I cannot stand it. It drives me insane. There is a lady that is around me often that likes to pick her toenails add it bugs me to death just the sound of it. All these sounds echo in my mind and I can’t stand it. My son sucks his thumb and it kills me. The worst is smacking your food.

    Reply
  163. Anna

    OMG I’m not alone, for me it is both Misophonia and Misokinesia. My sister will call me whilst eating an apple or crisps and will be slavering and crunching away, whilst trying to have a conversation. I find myself enraged, i cannot stand it, she will also sit in my presence and pick her head, then look at her fingers or her ears then sniff them or file or clip her finger nails at the dinner table. I find her disgusting, disrespectful and entirely inconsiderate but feel like i am the person with the problem. Today was the worst i have ever felt, absolutely enraged!!! I wanted to smash her face level of anger. However i was polite and said i cannot speak with her whilst she is eating on the phone. It took me a good fifteen minutes to calm down, i felt it all in my chest/heart area and it makes me feel like i must dislike my sister really or have something deep rooted or amiss. I feel bad for feeling like this, just awful

    Reply
  164. Heather

    I’m so happy to know that I am not alone in this!
    I cannot stand the sounds people make when they eat. I don’t mean the sound of the food, like the crunch of a crisp for example – I mean the slurping / chachling** sounds that they make with their mouths ((**I have no idea what that would be in English, only the Scottish word and I don’t even think that I have spelled it correctly haha – the best explanation I have of the sound would be someone noisily chewing gum **shudders**)).
    My husband is the noisiest eater and drinker that I have ever met. We cannot eat at a dinner table, we have to be in the sitting room so that I can have the TV on to hide his “mouth noises” when we eat.
    Also, my daughter (like myself) has anxiety issues. In her, this manifests with her bouncing her leg up and down constantly.
    When any of these things are happening, I can feel my heart beat racing and I feel very unreasonably angry. I need them to stop it, immediately.
    Aaaarrrggh!

    Reply
  165. Jenn

    I am in my 40’s and have suffered with both misophonia and misokinesia for as long as I can remember. The biggest triggers for me are whistling, gum chewing/popping, humming, and finger tapping. There are more, but these are daily. As for the misokinesia…ugh! Foot tapping, foot/leg “swinging” (when someone has their legs crossed and is either jostling their leg or foot up and down), swaying, hula hooping, hands by the face, ect.

    Any of the above, plus others I didn’t mention, induce irritation, a strong feeling of rage (not as often as I used to, but it is still there), and extreme anxiety. If I am having a particularly bad day, such activity will often make me cry because I am so overwhelmed.

    So glad I am not alone.

    Reply
  166. MisoSoup

    I could easily volunteer to be someone’s guinea pig for research into these sensory enigmas! I have misophonia, misokinesia, mild synesthesia and I get ASMR. No, I’m not autistic. Misophonia has been a problem for me for decades now, and I want to help find a solution. I mean, I’m not doing much else with my life but suffering major anxiety from this. Anyone need a study subject?

    Reply
    • Sheta

      Never heard of these before, but definitely have both aural and visual triggers. One of my triggers is someone at home laughing at something privately experienced – a book, something on their computer screen – which is compounded if they try to share the funny thing with me. If I can get through the sharing, I can usually laugh with them and the distress fades away.

      However, in the past couple of years, something new has come up. I now experience horrible involuntary physical and emotional responses to the sudden revving of a loud engine in close proximity – such as a motorcycle accelerating next to me on the road as I am driving. It almost causes me to lose control of my car, because I hunch up in protective mode, get a terrible shiver feeling, and have a moment of absolute panic. I have no idea what has caused this new problem.

      Most of my misophonic responses are limited to annoyance and snapping at people to stop. The visual is not quite as bad but I still speak up. (Can’t stand my seat shaking because an idiot down the row won’t stop jiggling, either.) But this engine thing is immediate and intense, and very disruptive.

      Reply
  167. Ralph

    I can relate to almost all of the above but my main triggers seem to be subtle sounds or repetitive flip flop scuffing. I’ve become instantly raged and have heart palpitations. I manage this by removing myself from the room as I feel it is my problem nobody else’s . I can definitely relate to the first story here and find it myself extremely difficult to visit the cinema for fear of rustling and subtle popcorn chewing .

    I get visual triggers also such as foot tapping or swinging your leg especially when watching TV . Finger tapping or twiddling

    I also enjoy running out on the road and get extremely infuriating when women runners have a ponytail bouncing all over their head I have to look at the floor as I pass them as I feel a desire to say something .

    Reply
  168. Berry

    I have had misophonia for about five years now, it’s been pretty much torturous for me and my family as I am only 14 years old, just recently misokinesia slammed into my life like a blink of an eye and it’s been extremely hard for me lately. The really annoying this is that it’s only my immediate family who irritate me so they get really mad that it only them and they feel like I “gang up” on them. My specific symptoms are when my mum and sister rub their nose, when my mum and sister touch their mouths, when my sister sucks her thumb, when my dad chews, everyone snoring, my mum talking ( as she smacks her lips when she does so )and just loud smacking lips in general, and eating. I feel like they try really really hard to help me and try to understand me but lately they’ve just been getting extremely angry at me when I don’t have any control over it. They tell me that I am the boss of myself and should just say “No, I am not going to give into this”, but as many times as I’ve told them I can’t control it, they still don’t seem to believe me. Sometimes they call me crazy, annoying and things like that but it’s not item a harsh way, but it still makes me think, am I? I wear earplugs 24/7 unless I’m with my dad and not eating or not around my family. I feel like I need to avoid my family and I have been but as I am still only young it feels wrong. I have tried talking to people about it but no one knows what it is or how to help me. I feel like I’m on high alert whenever I am at home and only ever be in my room but I want to be out with everyone else. It’s so difficult for me and I don’t know what to do. I went to the zoo th other spray with my friend and her mum and I had such a great time, but it only makes me think about if it were my mum there with us, I would’ve been miserable because I’d have to wear earplugs and avoid her. They tell me that they are not going to stop doing “ normal life functions “ as it would be over the top for them not to be able to rub their noses, so they do it. The car is hard because I need everyone in a specific seating plan ( but it’s still not perfect ), but they just get mad at me and tell me to “be normal” again not in a mean harsh way, but yet again, it makes me think if I’m not normal. Also if someone in my family were sad I wouldn’t be able to comfort them as they re sniffing. Overall, I’m a teenager and suffering from a diabetic younger sister, normal teenage problems, school work, friend problems, and now this. I don’t know what to do, any advice?

    Reply
  169. Gordon Bryant

    I felt as if I wrote that myself word for word. I can definitely relate and really wish there was some type of manageable cure for it. I’ve had to learn to control my outer emotions and also try to tell myself it’s not a big deal. Unfortunately that doesn’t always work. Even though I know it’s silly to get so bothered but have almost no control of the situation when its happening. The one I can’t control that sends me crazy is our dog licking the every piece of fabric we have nonstop sometimes. My fiance gets upset with me if I say something so I try not to but can’t help it most of the time. Any advice on that one? I have many more.

    Reply
  170. Beth

    So, gonna be honest. I read about 5 comments out the the couple hundred, so I don’t know if anyone has said this already or not haha. I have misophonia, and misokenesia? Or however those are spelled haha. My mom had me tested as a teen and figured out I also have “auditory processing syndrome/disorder”. I can’t remember if it’s disorder or syndrome. Point is, it’s the inability to tune things out. My dad would make fun of me and my sister growing up, hardcore, cuz he comes from a huge family and anything abnormal is automatically you being crazy. He would intentionally chew louder or make other noises to annoy us because he thought it was funny. Still pisses me off to this day, but now I know it’s kind of a fight or flight response. When my dad makes noises that bug me, I go into fight mode. When my husband chews loud or fidget, I go into flight mode. My husband isn’t doing these things intentionally, he has adhd and needs an outlet, and I get that, so I tend to run away and close all the doors between us AND put on a noisemaker. Anyway. Maybe the ‘phonias listed above (I gave up on spelling them) can be/are related to auditory processing disorder. Just a thought.

    Reply
  171. Erica

    I have always been curious of why I hate repetitive sounds and actions. I particularly hate people when they make sounds with their mouths while eating. At first I thought it was normal for me—seeing that my father taught us strict table manners which included not making slurpy or chomping sounds with our mouths while eating. Then I started hating other sounds—spoons moving across the plate or tinkling with the fork or other utensils, the sound of broomsticks when they’re used across a cemented surface, and even the repetitive statements of peopl (especially my mom). I always become agittated, angry, irritated, and upset to the point of wanting to cry and punch whomever is doing that noise. But it didn’t stop there. I then developed hatred toward people moving their knees or feet in a steady manner, or their hands. I thought I was going mental or stuff and was a bit scared for myself since I’ve always been different or weird but seeing this site…well it reassures me that I’m not the only one [although theories of it being associated to mental problems is still…]

    Reply
  172. KAREN

    Thank God! I am laughing and crying at the same time. Someone finally understands me. I have BOTH misophonia and misokenesia. I HATE to see people eat and open and close their mouths as their tongues slowly and lazily dart in and out of their mouths like a fat lazy sloth lapping up the remnants of food from their troughs. I HATE the sound of any eating, bodily noises, repeated hand noises, etc. Crickets and frogs all night long almost lull me to sleep. Human noises evoke violence, panic, and anger. I actually just leave the area or close my eyes so I don’t see. I’ve always felt alone and odd because of this. I wondered if I am autistic. I have a master’s degree and question whether or not I’m mildly retarded. What a relief that I’m not alone. I wish there were a magic pill to make this better. Sometimes it interferes with my life.

    Reply
  173. KAREN

    What about lazy talkers? I can’t handle when people speak like their lips are 2 overly inflated wet water balloons and you can see their fat heavy tongues moving with difficulty as they struggle spew out words.

    Reply
  174. Suzanne Dyda

    I had no idea until relatively recently when I saw an article on facebook which I could relate to every single one of the trigger noises for Misophonia, tapping, clicking pens, jewellery, shuffling feet, chewing gum, food noises, people eating toast, knife and fork noises on plates, even light breathing, snoring, slurping etc. What I hadn’t realised is that it could be linked to my aversion to certain movements, people chewing their nails, rotating thumbs round each other, wiggling of feet constantly.. and much more! I just thought I was slightly mad! Loud bar noises, coffee machines in cafe’s mean that I often walk out of somewhere as I cant cope with the noise, instant anger and aggression.

    I’ve actually got on a busy tube train and immediately on the loud rickety underground heard a woman clicking her bag fastener all the way down the carriage over the loud underground!

    Reply
  175. Mark

    Misophonic, and I’ve noticed something a little like this too. It might be a little tied to social anxiety (which I believe may be the root cause for me, with misophonia as more a symptom). It manifests when I see whatever movement out of the corner of my eye that might be causing a not-consciously-audible sound, and not at all when somebody is sitting still.

    Usually it’s seeing a family member eating out of the corner of my eye even if I can’t see them, or an animal licking itself.

    Reply
  176. Geoff

    I am so glad to have found this site. I am approaching 60 and have suffered with what I now know to be misophonia and misokinaesia since my teens. In my youth it was the constant flicking of my father’s cigarettes and his restless foot. This reulted in rages I found very hard to control. Now it is the sound of my son chewing and his fidgeting and restless legs when sitting watching TV. This adds extra strain to our relationship. I think the problem is amplified by personality mismatches. There is a touch of thoughtlessness in the perpetrators as well I believe. Anyway, enough from me and thanks for providing this platform and sharing.

    Reply
  177. Kim Teasdale

    Just when I thought I had sorted out my issues…
    I am 52 and have just realised that I have lived with Misophonia and Misokinesia for all of my life.
    I grew up in a household where my mother would aggressively shout, bang stuff, like doors and kitchenware, and noisily chew gum everyday. I remember always having to ask her to please stop which made it even worse.
    My partners crisp crunching drives me to the edge of my nerves. Certain tones of music hurt my head and I also have tinnitus. The breaking of a dropped glass sends me into a rage, that happened today and is how I found this page.
    It has given me anxiety and now I am wondering if the two are linked?
    It is a comfort to know that I am not alone.
    The flight or flight hits me full force and I find I become very irritable and sometimes irrational.
    I am happy to be a part of any clinical trials should you need to further your research.
    Thanks once again.

    Reply
  178. Sara

    I’m over 60 and only just beginning to realise that many of my ‘sensitivities’ are linked together in this way. I’m so glad to discover that I’m not merely an intolerant control freak. I hate the sound of people eating and drumming their fingers, but worst of all for me is the sounds of people talking on the radio – that’s unbearable and my poor partner has to turn radio talk programmes off if I’m in the room. The misokinesia part is to do with nail biting. I absolutely can’t stand to watch or hear someone biting their nails. It’s hard to explain how infuriated I feel by this. I’m also interested to read the links between misophonia, misokinesia, synesthesia and ASMR. I’m also synesthesic – numbers, days of the week etc have colours and I feel uneasy and nauseated by particular colour combinations and the sight and feel of some metal objects. Interestingly though, I love ASMR recordings and find them very relaxing – as long as it’s not mouth or chewing sounds. I sleep every night with a fan on so that I can’t hear other sounds. I’m hoping that more research will help many of us feel less like weirdos and more accepted.

    Reply

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