Emily C. Daniels, Andrew Rodriguez, Darya L. Zabelina

Abstract: “… to investigate the extent to which the severity of misophonia symptoms is linked with cognitive control under misophonia symptom-provocation circumstances in the general population sample…

Stronger emotional behavioral reactions to misophonia trigger sounds were significantly associated with the larger Stroop effect when participants were exposed to the misophonia trigger sounds, but not when they were exposed to the universally unpleasant sounds. This effect held when controlling for the personality trait of Neuroticism and for baseline levels of anxiety.

Both elevated misophonia sound sensitivity and emotional behaviors towards trigger sounds significantly correlated with higher self-reported anxiety when performing the Stroop task. However, only elevated emotional behaviors towards trigger sounds were linked with higher anxiety levels at baseline, suggesting that people who experience stronger emotions and behavioral reactions to misophonia trigger sounds may have higher anxiety at a trait level…”

Conclusion: “Results from the present study provide evidence that misophonia may significantly deplete cognitive control when people with elevated misophonia symptomatology are placed in misophonia symptom-provocation circumstances.

Even after controlling for the personality trait of Neuroticism, cognitive control was significantly reduced in people who reported elevated misophonia emotional behaviors to trigger sounds when they were exposed to such sounds. Further, both elevated misophonia sound sensitivity and emotional behaviors to trigger sounds were linked with overall slower speed of responses on the measure of cognitive control, specifically when exposed to the triggers.

Finally, the severity of misophonia symptoms was significantly associated with higher self-reported anxiety in both symptom-provocation circumstances, and when exposed to universally unpleasant sounds. These results provide strong support that misophonia is associated with functional depletion of cognitive control under symptom-provocation circumstances, demonstrating the need for future studies.”

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